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Xxx meeting of the summit implementation


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XXX MEETING OF THE SUMMIT IMPLEMENTATION

REVIEW GROUP (SIRG)


Date: July 21- 22, 2003
Place: Rubén Darío Meeting Room 804

Organization of American States

Washington, DC.
See agenda and attached list of participants.

Opening Address by the Secretary General of the OAS


The session started with the opening remarks by the Chair of the Summit Process, Ambassador Eduardo Sguiglia, Undersecretary on Latin American Issues at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, International Trade and Worship of Argentina and National Coordinator for the Summits of the Americas Process. It was followed by the intervention of Dr. Miguel Hakim Simon, Under Secretary for Latin America and the Caribbean of Mexico and Chair of the Special Summit of the Americas.
The Secretary General referred to the impact that the Summit process has had on the OAS in defining the Inter-American agenda, and in determining the work of the Summits of the Americas Secretariat, in support of the efforts of the countries and in the coordination and monitoring of the implementation of mandates within the OAS. He mentioned the good work of the Joint Summit Working Group, where the institutions harmonize their agendas around the Summits and cooperate with one another in supporting the implementation of Summit mandates. Furthermore, he highlighted Ministerial meetings as being a fundamental part of the Summit process and emphasized the need for finding mechanisms and resources to support these meetings and to systematize the information received from these Ministerial meetings.
In addition, the Secretary General mentioned that civil society participation in the Summit process and in OAS activities had made progress. Proof of this was the meeting with civil society prior to the General Assembly of the OAS in Chile. He added that this strategic alliance with all the actors of the Hemisphere was key in confronting current challenges.
Finally, the Secretary General emphasized the enormous importance and great expectations for the Special Summit, since the Washington Consensus is no longer sufficient in interpreting the realities and the economic and political objectives. He highlighted that the hemisphere has the need for a collective agenda that helps us move through these difficult times.
In addition, he requested assistance from all the countries for the SIRG Specific Fund so that the OAS can provide support to the countries in the process.


Address by the Chair of the Summit Process

Ambassador Eduardo Sguiglia first recognized the work of Canada as Chair of the Summit Process. He also mentioned that there is currently a framework for exclusion and social inequality. The Hemisphere faces multiple and complex challenges and therefore we need true social development, he said.



Address by the Chair of the Special Summit


Dr. Miguel Hakim Simón, on behalf of President Vicente Fox and Foreign Affairs Minister Derbez, stated that Mexico is very pleased to be the host of the Special Summit of the Americas and thanked the Summits of the Americas Secretariat for its collaboration in the preparatory activities.
He expressed Mexico’s confidence in the leaders' ability to focus their deliberations on the need for promoting a new economic and social development agenda, in order to strengthen democratic governance.
He stated that the issues of economic growth with equity, social development and democratic governance, which were agreed upon at the last SIRG meeting, will facilitate the identification of the components that should integrate a brief but conclusive Political Declaration.
1. Presentation of the Conceptual Framework for the Special Summit of the Americas (SSA)
Dr. Miguel Hakim Simón explained that the conceptual framework is a reference point based on chapter 11 of the Inter-American Democratic Charter. He mentioned that at the previous SIRG Executive Council and Steering Committee meetings, the general observation of the countries was that the document lacked emphasis on democratic governance, and that the issues should be clearly interconnected and carry the same relative weight.

Panama requested that the Monterrey Conference, trade issues, the Inter-American Democratic Charter, and the Millennium Development Goals be taken into account. Also the issues of science and technology, and democratic governance, which were discussed in Chile, should be included.




Peru mentioned that the issue of democratic governance is very important and supported Argentina’s proposal to include the issue of the crisis of political parties, and the participation of civil society. They also mentioned that the following issues should be included within the agenda:





  • The importance of creating an environment of confidence and safety

  • The importance of international cooperation

  • Racial and gender discrimination

  • The role of international financial organizations in social development


El Salvador emphasized that in the area of economic growth with equity, reference should be made to the following sub- themes:

  • Free trade and investment to reduce the poverty

  • Agricultural management and rural development

  • Financing for development (Monterrey)

  • Management of natural disasters

In the area of Social Development, the following sub-themes should be included:



  • Education and health

The agenda should be further developed in the area of Democratic Governance.


They highlighted that in chapter 2 of the IDB document, there are existing programs and specific costs which should be reviewed. El Salvador reported that they would be sending their observations in writing.

Guyana indicated that the Special Summit of the Americas provides an opportunity to evaluate what has been accomplished since Quebec City, and to analyze the situation in order to see if we need to implement changes in the region. They also indicated that the delegations of CARICOM believe that the Summit should discuss the issue of social development, and that health and education should be taken into account.




The United States added that the Summit Conceptual Framework should be based on the Quebec City Plan of Action and on the Monterrey Consensus. USA emphasized that it is essential to ensure that democratic governance has an important place in the agenda. They also added that the Special Summit should strengthen the legitimacy of democracy and its institutions and ensure that everyone benefits from globalization. The Summit should be an executive meeting, well focused, so that leaders can discuss concrete commitments.

For Colombia working under the slogan “Creating Opportunities for Equity and Democracy” is of great interest. They considered discussing economic problems as essential. Colombia emphasized that the effects produced by armed conflicts in social life (violence and poverty) and the acknowledgement of the devastating results of violence on the economic development of the countries should be included. The elements of governance discussed in Chile and in the Cusco Consensus should be taken into consideration. Lastly, they highlighted that the Conceptual Framework has a multidimensional approach by including the subjects of equity, poverty, and social development.


Brazil stated that the proposal to celebrate a Special Summit of the Americas was only accepted by their government because it was going to be centered on social issues. It expressed that the Special Summit should be oriented towards identifying mechanisms to overcome poverty and hunger in the region, and that the Summit process must be able to demonstrate that it can change this reality. Even though the priority given in past Summits to combating poverty and hunger was reflected in their agendas, much attention has been given to the trade negotiations. They also referred to the importance of cooperation in science and technology in order to face poverty, and highlighted the importance of collaboration with other non-governmental actors such as the private sector, the academia and civil society for the success of these actions.

Uruguay noted the importance of tying together the three issues on the agenda and gave great importance to education, especially education for democracy, which brings out the values that we share in the hemisphere. They spoke about the need for concrete and operational commitments that prevent negative impact and strengthen positive developments.




Venezuela reminded the participants that in October, under the OAS framework, there would be a meeting on social development, whose recommendations could be incorporated into the considerations for the Special Summit of the Americas. Furthermore, they emphasized that the three issues are interconnected.




Chile discussed the importance of the market and having the appropriate rules for the market to function, and indicated that economic growth is important in reducing inequalities. Other issues that were suggested are: transparency, responsibility in the use of public resources and its appropriate management, and the fight against corruption. They added that it was necessary to review what the countries have accomplished and evaluate and place an emphasis on a few central elements for future action. They stated that they are not interested in creating another Plan of Action.

Canada referred to the importance of incorporating the new leaders of the Hemisphere into the Summit process and highlighted the need for strengthening the confidence of its citizens in governments and in the future of the Hemisphere. They added that it was essential to emphasize the synergy among the three themes of the Summit and to discuss a joint vision for better use of resources. Furthermore, Canada highlighted that an evaluation of the Quebec City Summit would happen at the IV Summit of the Americas in Argentina.



Bolivia highlighted the importance of overcoming poverty, especially extreme poverty, in order to improve the life conditions of the affected sectors. They also noted the relationship between economic growth with equity, social development as social inclusion, and democratic governance.
In short, the Chair stated that the previous observations should be part of the Political Declaration.
2. Draft Agenda of the SSA
Dr. Hakim reported that Argentina, Canada, Peru, and Venezuela sent their comments on the draft agenda (CEA/2003/DT esp./01) and that Mexico took them into account while preparing the following draft agenda:


  1. Economic Growth with Equity

  • Participation of the private sector as an engine of the economic growth. Appropriate market rules.

  • Creation of opportunities for all. Better income distribution. Adequate economic, fiscal, and monetary policies. Good management of public resources.

  • Monterrey Consensus. Mechanisms for financing growth with equity. Greater opening to international markets. Implementation of cooperation instruments for development.



  1. Social Development

  • Policies to guarantee development and social inclusion: reduction of poverty, hunger, and social exclusion.

  • Attention to all sectors of the population, with emphasis on the most vulnerable groups, through access to food, health care, education and housing.

  • Promotion of credit and financial services, property registration systems, partnerships between the public and private sectors, generation of jobs, assurance of a productive use of science and technology, including the reduction of the digital divide, and the establishment of social protection systems in critical times.




  1. Democratic Governance

  • Interrelationship between democracy and economic and social development. Strengthening social unity and governance. Defining of public policies with social orientation.

  • Strengthening democratic systems. Respect for democracy. Greater transparency and accountability on the part of the governmental institutions: the fight against corruption. Innovative financial mechanisms for democratic governance.

  • Civil society participation and access to information.



The United States proposed that each subject have only 2 sub-themes:

1. Economic Growth and Reduction of Poverty



  1. Enabling Private Sector - Led Growth

  2. Access to capital

2. Investing in People



  1. Access to quality education

  2. Access to health services

3. Democratic Governance



  1. Fight against corruption

  2. Rule of Law and strengthening of democratic institutions



El Salvador expressed that key categories should center the discussion. They stated that the structure of the agenda is correct if it is focused, enabling each leader to explore the issue that they consider appropriate.




Peru indicated that the subjects selected should fit with the interests of the countries, and that the economic approach is only one part of the entire panorama, and cited the need for an integrated and political approach.




Colombia considered it important to include elements of cooperation and regional financing mechanisms as alternatives to development, as well as political parties and strengthening political parties.




Brazil noted the positive response to the agenda proposed by Mexico in Santiago. They suggested that Mexico incorporate some suggestions presented by Argentina, and based on the agenda initially proposed, prepare a draft Declaration to be negotiated in the next meeting. Regarding the proposal presented by the United States, Brazil expressed difficulty in negotiating the titles of the themes again.




Argentina emphasized the importance of defining the theme of the Summit. The Summit should be focused on the social issues that people are concerned about and it should not be a limited to the promotion of investments in education and public health programs.



Peru expressed its interest in maintaining the issues presented in Mexico’s proposal, including the civil society participation and innovative financial mechanisms for democratic governance.
Countries agreed to maintain the three initial issues. Furthermore, they agreed to establish a maximum of three sub-themes per issue. Mexico will review the agenda and will submit a new version in accordance with the comments they received.
3. Proposed Slogan for the SSA
The following four slogans for the Special Summit were proposed:

Canada - “Commitment of the Americas”

USA - “Create Opportunities for All”

Mexico - “Create Opportunities for Equity and Democracy”

Argentina - “Social Development: Toward a new hemispheric consensus”

Ecuador proposed combining the four proposals into: “Social Development: Create Opportunities for All.”




Bolivia indicated that the phrase, “social inclusion” as the engine of development, should also be taken into consideration.



Brazil prefers that there is no slogan, but instead that they adopt as a title “Summit of the Americas on Social Inclusion,” following the example of the Summit of the Americas on Sustainable Development in Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia.

Antigua and Barbuda proposed the slogan “Social Development through Democratic Governance and Equity.”




Jamaica and Guyana expressed that it is better to now concentrate on the content and later on a slogan.




The United States indicated that the focus of the Summit should be on people and that the objective should be to communicate a message to the people. They proposed the slogan “Create Opportunities for All” adding that the key word that links the three themes together is “opportunity.”




Chile expressed that the basis of the slogan should reflect the three issues already agreed upon. They stated that it was reasonable to include the phrase “opportunities for all” or “creating opportunities for all” in the Summit slogan.

The slogan is still pending. The Chair of the Special Summit (SSA) and the Summits of the Americas Secretariat were instructed to submit a slogan proposal that takes into account the four proposals. Their proposal will later be considered by the SIRG.


4. Preparations for the Special Summit
a) Date of the Summit

The Chair conveyed that after a process of consultations was carried out that morning with the Steering Committee and the Executive Council, they agreed to propose the following dates for holding the Special Summit, while taking into account the agendas of the leaders, other important meetings and previously established Summits:


1. October 9 and 10, 2003

2. January 12 and 13, 2004


The location of the Summit will depend on the date. President Fox prefers Cancun if the Summit takes place in October. However if the Summit were held in January, it would be necessary to confirm hotel availability.

Venezuela expressed their concern about the October date because Venezuela hosts in October, within the OAS framework, the forum on poverty. The forum will take place on October 8th, 9th and 10th. Then expectation is to present its recommendations for consideration at the Special Summit of the Americas.



Chile, Bolivia, Haiti, and Guyana indicated their preference for January.
Finally, it was established that July 31, 2003 would be the deadline for the countries to state their preference for the date of the Special Summit of the Americas to be held in Mexico.
b) Venue of the Summit
The venue of the Summit depends on the date. There exists a preference for Cancun, but Cancun is subject to hotel availability, which depends on the date. Mexico has separated the substantive part from the logistical aspects of the Summit. The Accountant, Monica Ruiz, who is in charge of the Summit logistics, made a presentation on Cancun.

c) Format and Program Proposal for the Political Dialogue
The Chair presented the documents "Format for the Political Dialogue" (CEA/2003/DT esp./02) and the "Draft Program" (CEA/2003/ID esp/02). Mexico's proposal indicated that the event would be organized as follows: the leaders would arrive on the first day, followed by an official dinner hosted by President Fox in honor of the Heads of State of the Summit of the Americas. The second day would include the first two plenary sessions in the morning, followed by a luncheon-retreat and then in the afternoon the third session, the signing of the Political Declaration, the closing ceremony, and a press conference.
The introduction and conclusion of every plenary session will be carried out by a Head of State (duration 7 minutes), accompanied by a representative of the international agencies. In each plenary session, ten Heads of State (to be determined) would have the opportunity to each make a 7-minute presentation.
The countries supported the proposal to change the format presented by Mexico, as follows:
The first day would consist of the inauguration of the Summit, followed by the first plenary session "Economic Growth with Equity" and a State dinner hosted by the President of Mexico, Vincent Fox. The second day would include the final two plenary sessions, a luncheon-retreat for the Leaders, and without pre-defined format, the signing of the Political Declaration and a press conference.
A Head of State would give an introduction for each session, followed by observations by representatives of international organizations:

- First session "Economic Growth with Equity"– Enrique Iglesias, President of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)

- Second session “Social Development” - Executive Secretary of ECLAC

- Third session "Democratic Governance " - Cesar Gaviria, Secretary General of the OAS


In each session, ten Heads of State would participate. The Chair needs suggestions for Heads of State that would open the sessions.
Venezuela expressed its desire to register its President in the area of “Social Development.”
The Chair of the meeting indicated that the system for choosing the Presidents who will participate in each of the sessions will be decided by a “first come, first serve” basis, which means that it will be necessary for countries to submit their intentions to Mexico’s National Coordinator. They also suggested that the Presidents indicate two theme preferences, in the event that they are unable to distribute the themes equitably. Mexico emphasized the need for providing some selection criteria for the three Presidents who will introduce the theme of each plenary session.
The countries proposed various criteria including:


  1. “Troika” criteria

  2. Mexico, as host, should be the speaker of the three plenary

  3. President Fox invites the Leaders as motivational speakers

  4. Hosts of the Summits

    1. Canada, Argentina, and Mexico (proposal of Nicaragua)

    2. Mexico, Canada, and Chile (proposal of United States)


Belize expressed that this last proposal closes the possibility to the two sub-regions that have not been Summit hosts (Central America and Caribbean), while Haiti believes it is important to reserve a space to facilitate the presentation of ideas of countries most affected by poverty.
Mexico took note of the country’s observations and gave the delegates time to consult with their capitals on the format of the dialogue and draft program. Countries should send Mexico their comments as soon as possible in order for them to be circulated promptly.
5. Proposal for a Timetable
In the third week of August, Mexico will be sending the reviewed documents, including the first provisional draft Declaration and proposed that the next SIRG be held on September 22, 2003, with a dinner for the Steering Committee and the Executive Council the day before. Once the date of the Summit has been determined, they will be giving a more detailed timetable.
OTHER MATTERS
The Chair of the SIRG invited Irene Klinger, Executive Secretary of the Summits of the Americas Secretariat, to discuss other matters of interest to the delegates. The Secretary of Summits referred to a document circulated in the morning sessions of the Steering Committee and Executive Council that contained a strategic plan and a budget to carry out the necessary actions from now until the SSA. This included support for SIRG meetings, a communications strategy, the monitoring of Summit activities, and support for Ministerial meetings and the SSA in Mexico. She invited countries to make contributions to the SIRG fund so that the Secretariat will be able to carry out these activities.
The United States expressed its satisfaction with the new leadership, ideas and energy of the Summits Secretariat and emphasized the need for making contributions to the Summits Secretariat. They expressed that the United States intends to look into giving an additional contribution to the Summit Secretariat and encouraged other countries to do the same.
Chile referred to a new contribution of US $10,000 for 2003 and another US $10,000 for 2004.
Canada is very interested in continuing to support the Summit Secretariat and will soon be announcing a contribution.
Mexico indicated that a mechanism and resources must be explored, so that civil society can be incorporated into the process.
Finally, the Chair of the SSA expressed that they are willing to receive comments and suggestions from countries regarding the Declaration, even before they prepare the first draft.

LIST OF PARTICIPANTS

Countries
Antigua and Barbuda
Minister Counselor Starret D. Greene

Permanent Mission of Antigua and Barbuda to the OAS


Argentina
Eduardo Sguiglia

Coordinador Nacional


Alberto Eduardo Prosperi

Coordinador Adjunto, Ministerio Relaciones Exteriores de Argentina


Ministro Silvia María Merega

Encargado de Negocios, Misión Permanente ante la OEA


Consejero Eduardo Acevedo Díaz

Representante Alterno de Argentina ante la OEA


Secretario Sebastián David Molteni

Representante Alterno ante la OEA


Barbados
Ambassador Michael King

Permanent Representative of Barbados to the OAS


First Secretary Donna Forde

Alternate Representative of Barbados to the OAS


First Secretary Lisa Cummins

Alternate Representative of Barbados to the OAS


Commander David Dowridge

Deffense Attaché, Embassy of Barbados


Belize
Ambassador Lisa M. Shoman

Permanent Representative of Belize to the OAS


Minister Counselor Nestor Mendez

Permanent Mission of Belize to the OAS


Bolivia
Embajadora María Tamayo-Arnal

Representante Permanente de Bolivia ante la OEA


María del Carmen Oblitas

Representante Alterna de Bolivia ante la OEA


Brasil
Embaixador Valter Pecly Moreira

Representante Permanente do Brasil junto à OEA


Primeiro-Secretário José Augusto Andrade

Missão Permanente do Brasil junto à OEA


Primeiro-Secretário Antonio Otávio de Sá Ricarte

Coordenação-Geral de Acompanhamento de Mecanismos Políticos Multilaterais


Canada
Gwyn Kutz

Counsellor and Alternate Representative of Canada to the OAS


Douglas Challborn

Deputy Director (Policy) LIA


Chile
Embajador Carlos Portales Cifuentes

Coordinador Nacional- Director General de Política Exterior, Chile


Embajador Esteban Tomic

Representante Permanente de Chile ante la OEA


Carola Muñoz

Representante Alterna de Chile ante la OEA


Colombia
Francisco Alberto González

Coordinador Asuntos EEUU, Canadá y Cumbre de las Américas

Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores
Ministro Plenipotenciario María Clara Isaza Merchán

Misión de Colombia ante la OEA


Embajador Horacio Serpa Uribe

Representante Permanente de Colombia ante la OEA


Costa Rica
Embajador Agustín Castro

Representante Alterno de Costa Rica ante la OEA


Ministro Consejero Rodrigo A. Sotela

Representante Alterno de Costa Rica ante la OEA


Ecuador
Embajador Marcelo Hervas

Representante Permanente de Ecuador ante la OEA


El Salvador
Embajadora Margarita Escobar

Representante Permanente de El Salvador ante la OEA


Consejero Arthur Guth Jokisch

Representante Alterno de El Salvador ante la OEA


Guatemala
Embajador Víctor Hugo Godoy Morales

Representante Permanente de Guatemala ante la OEA


Guyana
Ambassador Odeen Ishmael

Permanent Representative of Guyana to the OAS


Haití
Dorsainville Frantz

Directeur des Affaires politiques

Ministere des relations exterieures
Jean Ricot Dormeus

Ministre Conseiller

Misión permanente d’Haiti aupres de l’OEA
Honduras
Embajador Salvador Rodezno Fuentes

Representante Permanente de Honduras ante la OEA


Consejera Guadalupe Carias

Representante Permanente de Honduras ante la OEA


Jamaica
Minister Delrose E. Montague

Alternate Representative of Jamaica to the OAS


México
Doctor Miguel Hakim Simón

Subsecretario para América Latina y el Caribe, Presidente de la Cumbre Extraordinaria de las Américas


Embajador Miguel Ruíz-Cabañas

Representante Permanente de México ante la OEA


Embajadora María Carmen Oñate Muñoz

Directora General de Organismos y Mecanismos Regionales Americanos. Coordinadora Nacional para la Cumbre de las Américas


Ministro Alfredo Miranda Ortiz

Director General Adjunto de Organismos y Mecanismos Regionales Americanos. Coordinador Nacional Adjunto para la Cumbre de las Américas


Ministro Ernesto Campos Tenorio

Representante Alterno de México ante la OEA


C.P. Mónica Ruiz Huerta

Coordinadora General de las Organización de la Cumbre Extraordinaria de las Américas


C.P. María del Carmen Palafox Ramos

Coordinadora de Hospedaje y Servicios de la Cumbre Extraordinaria de las Américas


Segundo Secretario Edgar Cubero Gómez

Representante Alterno de México ante la OEA




Nicaragua
Renee Morales

Subdirectora de la Dirección de América del Norte, Ministerio RREE


Embajadora Carmen Marina Gutiérrez Salazar

Representante Permanente ante la OEA


Julieta M. Blandon Miranda

Primer Secretario de la Misión de Nicaragua ante la OEA


Panamá
Embajador Ricardo González de Mena

Representante Adjunto de Panamá ante la OEA


Paraguay
Federico A. González

Director General de Política Multilateral


Embajador Luis Enrique Chase Plate

Representante Permanente del Paraguay ante la OEA


Alvaro Díaz de Vivar

Segundo Secretario de la Misión Permanente del Paraguay ante la OEA


Perú
Embajador José Luis Pérez Sánchez-Cerro

Subsecretario de Asuntos Multilaterales del Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores


Embajador Eduardo Ferrero Costa

Representante Permanente del Perú ante la OEA


Ministro Antonio García

Representante Alterno del Perú ante la OEA


Primer Secretario Ricardo Silva-Santisteban

Representante Alterno del Perú ante la OEA


República Dominicana
Embajadora Sofía Leonor Sánchez Baret

Representante Permanente de la República Dominicana ante la OEA


Ministra Consejera Mayerlyn Cordero

Misión de la República Dominicana ante la OEA


Consejero Carlos Caraballo

Representante Alterno de la República Dominicana ante la OEA


Saint Kitts and Nevis
Ambassador Izben C. Williams

Permanent Representative of Saint Kitts and Nevis to the OAS


Saint Vincent ant The Grenadines
Ambassador John Ellsworth

Permanente Representative to the OAS


Charmaine Atkinson-Jordan

Programme Manager, Foreign Policy and Community Relations


Trinidad and Tobago
Ambassador Marina A. Valère

Permanent Representative of Trinidad and Tobago to the OAS


Counsellor Paul C. Byam

Embassy of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago


United States
Ambassador Roger Noriega

US Permanent Representative to the OAS


Ambassador John Maisto

National Summit Coordinator, DOS


Ambasador Peter DeShazo

Deputy US Permanent Representative to the OAS


Steve Liston

Deputy Summit Coordinator, DOS


Terry Tracy

Assistant Summit Coordinator, DOS


David Hults

Assistant Summit Coordinator, DOS


Tomika Konditi

Assistant Summit Coordinator, DOS


Kurt van der Walde

Financial Affairs Officer, DOS


Margarita Riva-Geoghegan

Counselor, Alternate Representative to the OAS


Clark Crook-Caston

Alternate Representative, US Mission to the OAS


Cecily Mango

Deputy Director LAC, USAID


Chris Kushlis

International Economist, Treasury


Nancy Lee

Treasury
Ramin Toloui

Treasury
Heidi Cruz

Director, National Security Council


Violanda Botet

Office of the Legal Advisor, DOS


Karen Harbert

Deputy Assistant Administrator, USAID/LAC


William Steiger

US Department of Health and Human Services


Juan Ramos

US Department of Health and Human Services


William H. Duncan

Officer of Mexican Affairs DOS


Mary Catherine Malin

US Legal Advisor


Uruguay
Embajador Juan Enrique Fischer

Representante Permanente de Uruguay ante la OEA


Laura Dupuy

Primer Secretario de la Misión de Uruguay ante la OEA


Venezuela
Alexandra Paris Parra

Directora de Asuntos Multilaterales, Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores


Marco Palavicini

Representante Alterno de Venezuela ante la OEA


Organizations
Organization of American States
César Gaviria

Secretario General de la OEA


Luigi Einaudi

Secretario General Adjunto de la OEA


Irene Klinger

Executive Secretary, Summits of the Americas Secretariat


Jane Thery

Summits of the Americas Secretariat


Jacqueline Deslauriers

Summits of the Americas Secretariat


María Fernanda Trigo

Summits of the Americas Secretariat


Jorge Sanín

Summits of the Americas Secretariat


Ambassador Albert R. Ramdin

Adviser to the Secretary General


Carmen Lomellin

Executive Secretary, Inter-American Commission of Women


Alice Abreu

Director, Office of Science and Technology


L Ronald Scheman

Director General, IACD


Magdalena Talamás

Instituto Interamericano del Niño


David Beall

Executive Secretary CICAD


Anna McG. Chisman

Jefa, Reducción de la Demanda, CICAD


Institutions
Carlos M. Jarque

Gerente, Departamento de Desarrollo Sostenible, BID


Edmundo Jarquin

Jefe, División de Estado, Gobernabilidad y Sociedad Civil, BID


Janine Perfit

Especialista Senior en Sociedad Civil, BID


Inés Bustillo

Director Washington Office, ECLAC


Raquel Artecona

Regional Adviser on International Trade ECLAC


Rex García

Statistical Assistant ECLAC


P. Lizardo de las Casas

Director Oficina Seguimiento Proceso Cumbres IICA


Joan E. Segerson

Special Advisor to the Director General IICA


Mark Meassick

Strategic Planning Specialist IICA


Lourdes Flor

External Relations Officer PAHO - WHO







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