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Guide to mobilizing local assets and your


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DISCOVERING COMMUNITY POWER:

A GUIDE TO MOBILIZING LOCAL ASSETS AND YOUR

ORGANIZATION’S CAPACITY

A Community-Building Workbook
From the
Asset-Based Community Development Institute

School of Education and Social Policy


Northwestern University

2120 Campus Drive

Evanston, IL 60208-4100

John P. Kretzmann and John L. McKnight, Co-Directors

By

John P. Kretzmann and John L. McKnight, Co-Directors



with Sarah Dobrowolski, Project Coordinator

and Deborah Puntenney, Ph.D.



Acknowledgments

Funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) Institute developed “Discovering Community Power: A Guide to Mobilizing Local Assets and Your Organization’s Capacity.”

Please note: although this document is copyrighted, permission for use will be granted upon notification of intended use to the ABCD Institute.
Please email the ABCD Institute (abcd@northwestern.edu) with the name of your group or organization and a brief description of how you plan to use the Guide.

This information will help us with future research and evaluation.



The Guide is available to download freely on the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s
website: www.wkkf.org
and the ABCD Institute’s website:
www.northwestern.edu/ipr/abcd.html

Introduction
Strengthening Your Proposal – And Your Organization

By Connecting With Community Assets
The W.K. Kellogg Foundation is very interested in proposals that both improve the community and strengthen the applicant organization. Our experience indicates that proposals which connect with and engage a wide range of community resources are more effective than those which involve only the staff of the lead organization. We are also convinced that non-profit organizations are much more powerful community actors when they are not exclusively focused on needs, problems, and deficiencies but are effectively connected to the resources, or assets, of the local community.
This document will help any organization:
1. Strengthen its own organization by enhancing connections with the community’s assets.
2. Strengthen the community by investing in the community’s assets.
3. Strengthen current and future community based projects, activities, and proposals.
The following pages are divided into three sections to help applicants connect with community assets.
Section One – How to assess and strengthen your proposal’s relationships with and utilization of community assets; and
Section Two – How to identify and connect your non-profit organization’s assets to this project.
Section Three – Tools which may be helpful in connecting both projects and organizations to community assets.
Section Four – Information about the ABCD Institute.
In Section One of this manual, we will introduce a series of questions designed to guide your reflections about a proposal’s relationships to five categories of community assets. These include:
1. Local residents – their skills, experiences, passions, capacities and willingness to contribute to the project. Special attention is paid to residents who are sometimes “marginalized”.
2. Local voluntary associations, clubs, and networks – e.g., all of the athletic, cultural, social, faith-based, etc. groups powered by volunteer members – which might contribute to the project.
3. Local institutions- e.g. public institutions such as schools, libraries, parks, police stations, etc., along with local businesses and non-profits – which might contribute to the project.
4. Physical assets – e.g. the land, the buildings, the infrastructure, transportation, etc. which might contribute to the project.
5. Economic assets – e.g. what people produce and consume, businesses, informal economic exchanges, barter relationships, etc.
In Section Two, we will provide questions to guide you in asking about your own organization’s wide range of assets, and their relationship to the proposed project.
In Section Three, you will find additional tools and illustrations to help you connect your proposal and your organization with community assets.
In Section Four, you will find information about the ABCD Institute.
Throughout this document you will see several symbols repeated:


  • When you see this symbol, what follows is a really important idea.




you can find additional information.

Producing Strong Community-Based Projects
This document is based on the following simple equation:

Your Community’s Assets

Connected To (+)

Your Organization’s Assets

Produces (=)

Strong Community-Based Projects


Section I:

An Asset-Based Framework to Explore Your Project

Section I
Index
How to assess and strengthen your proposal’s relationships with
and utilization of community assets.

Page 5: Relationships with Local Residents
Page 6: Relationships with Residents Who are Often Marginalized
Pages 7-8: Relationships with Associations
Pages 9-10: Relationships with Institutions
Page 11: Relationships with Physical Space
Pages 12-13: Relationships with the Local Economy
Page 14: A Bridge to Resources outside the Local Community
Page 15: A Sample Community Asset Map
Page 16: Your Community Asset Map
Page 17: Connecting Your Community’s Assets to this Project


Relationships with Local Residents:


  • Sustainable projects are often powerfully related to the involvement of residents.



Example: In many communities, resident skills and interests are uncovered through the use of “skills surveys” or “capacity inventories.” These communities discover that everyone has gifts to contribute which can strengthen the community.


  • For sample capacity inventories, see Section 3, pages 23-24.

Below are questions which gauge your project’s interaction with local residents.




  • Our project mobilizes the skills and capacities of local residents.


Not at All Some A Great Deal
1 2 3 4 5
Describe:


  • Our project works to enhance the skills and capacities of local residents.


Not at All Some A Great Deal
1 2 3 4 5
Describe:



  • Local residents help define our project objectives.


Not at All Some A Great Deal
1 2 3 4 5
Describe:



  • Local residents will act as:

  • For definitions of these roles, see Section 3, Page 25.

Recipients Information Sources Participants In Control


Describe:

Relationships with Residents Who are Often Marginalized:
Communities are strengthened when organizations encourage and support diversity. Often times, groups of people, like welfare recipients, elders, youth and minorities, are marginalized and not recognized as contributing citizens within their community.
Example: In Minneapolis, the enterprising skills of new Latino immigrants formed the basis for the creation of the multi-million dollar Mercado Central, housing over 40 small businesses.
These questions encourage you to think about your proposed project and how it works to engage all community members and their strengths.
• Our project values the diversity in the community.
Not at All Some A Great Deal

1 2 3 4 5
Describe:

• This project invites participation from marginalized groups to be:



  • For definitions of these roles, see Section 3, Page 25.


Recipients Information Sources Participants In Control
Minorities
People on welfare
People w/ disabilities
Elders
Immigrants
Youth
Ex-Offenders
Other
Relationships with Local Associations
In many communities, voluntary networks of associations –large and small, formal and informal - are overlooked. Sustainable and effective projects work to engage these associations in participation and governance.
Example: In many communities, choirs, sports groups, and reading clubs agree to join together to support initiatives for young people or to involve older adults in community life.
The questions below ask about your project’s relationship with local associations.


  • For a Master List of Associations, see Section 3, Pages 26-27.




  • Our project has extensive relationships with our community’s citizens’ associations.


Not at All Some A Great Deal
1 2 3 4 5
Describe:



  • For this project, citizens’ associations are:

  • For role definitions, see Section 3, Page 25.


Recipients Information Sources Participants In Control
Faith Based
Health groups
School groups
Outdoor groups
Block clubs

Relationships with Local Associations (continued):
Recipients Information Sources Participants In Control
Service Clubs
Youth Groups
Unions
Arts organizations
Unnamed networks
Other

Relationships with Local Institutions:
Every community has an array of local public, private and nonprofit institutions. Each of these institutions has resources – such as personnel, space, expertise, equipment, and economic power – that can be contributed to your project.
Example: Many institutions, such as schools, parks, libraries and hospitals, make their space available to community and function essentially as community centers. For example, a library’s meeting room can become a site for community group meetings or teen club events.
Listed below are questions that help you to reflect upon your project’s engagement of local institutions.
• Our project has extensive relationships to institutions in the community.
Not at All Some A Great Deal
1 2 3 4 5
Describe:

• This project engages/uses the institutional assets of:


Personnel/ Economic Space & Constituents & Other

Expertise Power Equipment Connections
Schools
Describe:
Libraries
Describe:
Section I:
Relationships with Local Institutions (continued):
Personnel/ Economic Space & Constituents & Other

Expertise Power Equipment Connections
Hospitals
Describe:
Police
Describe:
Service

Agencies
Describe:

Other

Non-Profits



Describe:
Businesses
Describe:

Other
Describe:



Relationships with Physical Space:
Every community has physical assets, such as gardens, parks, bike paths, housing, streets, playgrounds and parking lots. It is particularly important that a community contain a variety of public spaces where people can gather and meet.
Example: At Bethel New Life, a Chicago Community Development Organization, and Brownfield’s are sites for employing residents newly trained in cleanup. An empty lot represents an opportunity for community gardens. A transit stop, with its concentrated pedestrian activity, is a business development opportunity and a new host for five enterprises and a day care center.
Below are two simple questions asking about your project’s interaction with physical assets and public spaces.
• Our project utilizes the value of local physical assets.
Not at All Some A Great Deal
1 2 3 4 5
Describe:

• Our project utilizes and enhances our community’s public spaces.


Not at All Some A Great Deal
1 2 3 4 5
Describe:

Relationships with the Local Economy:
Organizations and their projects have economic power. Who they hire, what supplies they purchase, what skills they teach, and what resources they offer all affect the local economy.
Example: In Blue Island, Illinois, and other communities, local businesses host senior fairs and develop senior friendly practices. In many places, local associations and institutions pledge to support “buy local” campaigns.
The series of questions below helps you to think about your project’s economic impact on the community.
• Our project is designed to enhance the local economy.
Not at All Some A Great Deal
1 2 3 4 5
Describe:
• Our project identifies and mobilizes the enterprise and job-related skills of local residents.
Not at All Some A Great Deal
1 2 3 4 5
Describe:
• Our project identifies and directs local consumer spending toward enterprise development and support of local businesses.
Not at All Some A Great Deal
1 2 3 4 5
Describe:
• Our project mobilizes the savings of local residents to reinvest in neighborhood economic development.
Not at All Some A Great Deal
1 2 3 4 5
Describe:
Relationships with the Local Economy (continued):
• Our project involves local citizen associations and institutions in business and economic development efforts.
Not at All Some A Great Deal
1 2 3 4 5
Describe:
• Our project employs local residents.
Not at All Some A Great Deal
1 2 3 4 5
Describe:
• Our project provides economic resources:
Not at All Some A Great Deal
-To local associations 1 2 3 4 5

-To local businesses 1 2 3 4 5

-To non-profits 1 2 3 4 5

A Bridge to Resources outside the Local Community:
A sustainable and effective project will first look to identify and connect assets within the community. After tapping into these local assets, the project may need to look outside to satisfy additional resource needs.
Example: A strong neighborhood group cleans up a blighted commercial strip and attracts new business investment. On a smaller scale, a local neighborhood involves residents in creating a children’s playground on a vacant lot, and persuades city government to provide swings and teeter-totters.
Below are questions about whether your organization acts as a bridge to external assets.
• Our project builds relationships outside the local community:
Not at All Some A Great Deal
To Institutions 1 2 3 4 5

-To Associations 1 2 3 4 5

-To Economic Resources 1 2 3 4 5

-To Government 1 2 3 4 5



Describe the connection to each of the external assets identified above:

A Sample Community Asset Map


Review this sample community asset map. Use the next page to create an asset map of your own community.

My Community

Individuals

Associations

Local Economy

Institutions

Physical

Institutions

Physical
Institutions

Schools


Universities

Community Colleges

Police Departments

Hospitals

Libraries

Social Service Agencies

Non Profits

Museums


Fire Departments

Media


Foundations
Physical Space

Gardens


Parks

Playgrounds

Parking lots

Bike Paths

Walking Paths

Forest / Forest Preserves

Picnic areas

Campsites

Fishing spots

Duck ponds

Zoos

Wildlife center



Natural Habitats - coastal,

Marine, amphibian

Bird Watching Sites

Star Gazing Sites

Housing

Vacant Land & Buildings



Transit stops and facilities

Streets
Local Economy

For-Profit Businesses

Consumer Expenditures

Merchants

Chamber of Commerce

Business Associations

Banks


Credit Unions

Foundations

Institutional - purchasing power

and personnel

Barter and Exchange

CDCs


Corporations & branches
Individuals

Gifts, Skills, Capacities, Knowledge

and Traits of:

Youth


Older Adults

Artists


Welfare Recipients

People with Disabilities

Students

Parents


Entrepreneurs

Activists

Veterans

Ex-offenders


Associations

Institutions

Individuals

Local Economy

Physical Space

Your Community Asset Map


Now that you have completed the questions on pages 5-14 and have reviewed a sample community asset map (page 15), please fill in the types of assets that can be found in your community.
Use the next page to connect these assets to your community based project.

Individuals

Associations

Local Economy

Institutionscal

My Community

Associations

Institutions

Individuals

Local Economy

Physical Space

Connecting Your Community’s Assets to This Project


When looking within your community, there are a number of assets that can be used to strengthen your project.
Connections
Identify your Community’s assets.
ASSOCIATIONS


INSTITUTIONS

INDIVIDUALS

PHYSICAL

LOCAL ECONOMY
How will these assets be connected to your project?

Section II
Index
How to assess and strengthen your non-profit organization’s assets in order to connect them to this project and to a wide range of community assets.

Page 19: A Window into My Organization

Page 20: Creating an Inventory of Your Organization’s Assets

Page 21: Connecting Your Organization’s Assets to This Project

A Window into My Organization


Review the types of assets that can be found within an organization.
Use the next page to document your own organization’s assets.
Personnel
Expertise in/outside of job;

Ability to teach:
Art

Music


Athletics
Individual abilities:
Finances

Community History Writers

Health Care
Individual Traits:
Ideas

Energy


Enthusiasm
Technical Training:
Computers

Communications

Vehicle Operations & Repair

Investigation and Research

Child Care
Networks of Connections
Knowledge of Community
Leadership Development
Space and Facilities
Meeting Rooms

Break Rooms or Kitchen

Glass Display Cases

Computer Rooms

Drinking Fountains

Gardens

Bulletin Boards

Lobbies

Parking Lots

Bathrooms
Expertise
Classes:
Arts, Athletics, Math,

GED, Literacy, Language


Educational Workshops:
Crime Prevention

Computer Literacy

Healthy Eating

Storytelling

Leadership Skills
Knowledge of Community
Education & Training
Courses
Constituents
Individual Abilities & Interests
Individual Traits:

Ideas, energy, idealism


Linkages to Adults & Children
Linkages to Community
Collective Abilities & Interests
Networks of Connections
Private Institutions
Public Institutions
Associations
Individuals
Materials & Equipment
Computers
Expensive Software
Desks, chairs, & other
Furniture
Scanner
Printing Equipment
Fax and Copier
Digital Camera
Books, magazines, & newspapers
Telephones for hearing impaired
Artworks
Literacy and GED materials
Community History Files
Information on Community
Organizations
Social Service Resources
Financial Information
Economic Power
Job Training
Sponsor Fundraisers
Hire Local People
Assist in Writing and
Submitting Grants for
Community Projects
Purchasing Power
Power to generate & receive special funds through bond issues, government, and foundations
Creating an Inventory of Your Organization’s Assets
Your organization is filled with people, knowledge, and materials that should be recognized and shared. Now that you have reviewed page 19, take a moment to:
• Identify your organization’s assets

• Document these assets

• Use the next page to connect these assets to your project
A Window into My Organization
Personnel Materials and Equipment
Space and Facilities
Economic Power
Constituents
Expertise
Networks of Connections
Connecting Your Organization’s Assets to This Project
When looking within your organization, there are a number of assets that can be used to strengthen your project.
Connections
Identify your organization’s assets.
PERSONNEL
EXPERTISE
ECONOMIC POWER
CONSTITUENTS
NETWORKS OF CONNECTIONS
SPACE & FACILITIES
MATERIALS & EQUIPMENT
How will these assets be connected to your project?

Index
Tools which may be helpful in connecting both projects and organizations to community assets.
Page 23: Sample – Capacity Inventory
Page 24: Sample – Capacity Inventory
Page 25: Residents and their Associations: A Power Ladder
Pages 26-27: Master List of Associations
Page 28: Partnerships with Associations
Page 29: Partnerships with Institutions
Sample — CAPACITY INVENTORY
Developed by the New Prospect Baptist Church, Cincinnati, OH
INTRODUCTION

My name is ____________________ what is your name?


Thank you for coming over. Did someone talk to you about what the

“Gift Exchange” is all about? What do you understand it to be?



Basically, we believe that everyone has God-given talents and gifts that can be used to benefit the community. I’d like to spend a few minutes talking to you about your gifts and skills.
GIFTS
Gifts are abilities that we are born with. We may develop them, but no one has to teach them to us.
1. What positive qualities do people say you have?
2 Who are the people in your life that you give to? How did you give it to them?
3. When was the last time you shared with someone else? What was it?
4. What do you give that makes you feel good?
SKILLS
Sometimes we have talents that we’ve acquired in everyday life such as cooking and fixing things.
1. What do you enjoy doing?
2. If you could start a business, what would it be?
3. What do you like to do that people would pay you to do?
4. Have you ever made anything? Have you ever fixed anything?
DREAMS
Before you go, I want to take a minute and hear about your dreams these goals you hope to accomplish.
1. What are your dreams?
2. If you could snap your fingers and be doing anything, what would it be?
Sample — CAPACITY INVENTORY
Developed by Greyrock Commons Co-Housing Community, Ft. Collins, CO
GIFTS I CAN GIVE MY COMMUNITY
GIFTS OF THE HEAD (Things I know something about and would enjoy talking about with others, e.g., art, history, movies, birds).
GIFTS OF THE HANDS (Things or skills I know how to do and would like to share with others, e.g., carpentry, sports, gardening, cooking).
GIFTS OF THE HEART (Things I care deeply about, e.g., protection of the environment, civic life, children).
Residents and their Associations:
A Power Ladder
Residents in Control
Residents as Participants
Residents as Recipients
Residents control:
Goal Setting; Planning; Implementation
Residents participate in:
Goal Setting; Planning; Implementation
Residents serve on governing body
Residents serve on advisory group
Residents serve as advocates for the organization
Residents as Information Sources
Residents are part of focus groups
Staff consults with residents
Residents fill out need surveys
Residents receive services

Section III:
Helpful Tools for Connecting Assets
A Community Building Workbook ©2005 Asset-Based Community Development Institute
MASTER LIST OF ASSOCIATIONS
1. Addiction Prevention and Recovery Groups
Drug Ministry/Testimonial Group for Addicts
Campaign for a Drug Free Neighborhood
High School Substance Abuse Committee
2. Advisory Community Support Groups (friends of…)
Friends of the Library
Neighborhood Park Advisory Council
Hospital Advisory Group
3. Animal Care Groups
Cat Owner’s Association
Humane Society
4. Anti Crime Groups
Children’s Safe Haven Neighborhood Group
Police Neighborhood Watch
Senior Safety Groups
5. Block Clubs
Condominium Owner’s Association
Building Council
Tenant Club
6. Business Organizations/ Support

Groups
Jaycees
Local Chamber of Commerce
Economic Development Council
Local Restaurant Association
7. Charitable Groups and Drives
Local Hospital Auxiliary
Local United Way
United Negro College Fund Drive
8. Civic Events Groups
Local Parade Planning Committee
Arts and Crafts Fair
July 4th Carnival Committee
Health Fair Committee
9. Disability/Special Needs Groups
Special Olympics Planning Committee
Local American Lung Association
Local Americans with Disabilities Association
Local Muscular Dystrophy Association
10. Cultural Groups
Community Choir
Drama Club
Dance Organization
High School Band
11. Environmental Groups
Neighborhood Recycling Club
Sierra Club
Adopt-a-Stream
Bike Path Committee
Clean Air Committee
Pollution Council
Save the Park Committee
12. Education Groups
Local School Council
Local Book Clubs
Parent Teacher Association
Literacy Council
Tutoring Groups
13. Elderly Groups
Hospital Seniors Clubs
Westside Seniors Clubs
Church Seniors Clubs
Senior Craft Club
14. Family Support Groups
Teen Parent Organization
Foster Parents’ Support Group
Parent Alliance Group
15. Health Advocacy and Fitness Groups
Weight Watchers
YMCA/YWCA Fitness Groups
Neighborhood Health Council
Traffic Safety Organization
Child Injury Prevention Group
Yoga Club
16. Heritage Groups
Black Empowerment Group
Norwegian Society
Neighborhood Historical Society
African American Heritage Association
17. Hobby and Collectors Group
Coin Collector Association
Stamp Collector Association
Arts and Crafts Club
Garden Club of Neighbors
Sewing Club
Antique Collectors
18. Men’s Groups
Fraternal Orders
Church Men’s Organizations
Men’s Sports Organizations
Fraternities
19. Mentoring Groups
After School Mentors
Peer Mentoring Groups
Church Mentoring Groups
Big Brothers, Big Sisters
Rights of Passage Organizations
20. Mutual Support Groups
La Leche League
Disease Support (cancer, etc.)
Parent-to-Parent Groups
Family-to-Family Groups
21. Neighborhood Improvement Groups
The Neighborhood Garden Club
Council of Block Clubs
Neighborhood Anti-Crime Council
Neighborhood Clean-up Campaign
22. Political Organizations
Democratic Club
Republican Club
23. Recreation Groups
Kite-flying Club
Bowling Leagues
Basketball Leagues
Body Builders Club
Little League
24. Religious Groups
Churches
Mosques
Synagogues
Men’s Religious Groups
Women’s Religious Groups
Youth Religious Groups
25. Service Clubs
Zonta
Optimist
Rotary Clubs
Lions Clubs
Kiwanis Clubs
26. Social Groups
Bingo Club
Card Playing Club
Social Activity Club

Dance Clubs


27. Social Cause/Advocacy/Issue Groups
Get Out the Vote Council
Peace Club
Hunger Organizations
Vigil Against Violence
Community Action Council
Social Outreach Ministry
Soup Kitchen Group
28. Union Groups
Industrial (UAW)
Crafts Unions (Plumbing Council)
29. Veteran’s Groups
Veterans of Foreign Wars
Women’s Veterans Organizations
30. Women’s Groups
Sororal Organizations
Women’s Sports Groups
Women’s Auxiliary
Mother’s Board
Eastern Star
31. Youth Groups
After School Group
4-H
Girl and Boy Scouts
Junior Achievement
Campfire Girls
Use this tool to illustrate partnerships that your organization already has with associations in your community and to think about new partnerships which might be useful to this project and your organization.
EXISTING
POTENTIAL

Partnerships with Association Your Organization
Use this tool to illustrate partnerships that your organization already has with institutions in your community and to think about new partnerships which might be useful to this project and your organization.
EXISTING
POTENTIAL
Partnerships with Institutions Your Organization

Section IV:
Information about the ABCD Institute
A Community Building Workbook ©2005 Asset-Based Community Development Institute
Index
Information about the ABCD Institute.
Page 31: ABCD Institute Background Information
Page 32: List of ABCD Adjunct Faculty Members
Pages 33-34: List of ABCD Institute Publications
Asset-Based Community Development Institute, Northwestern University

Background Information
The ABCD Institute is frequently credited with changing the paradigm which defines community development. The traditional approach started with a struggling community’s needs, problems, and deficiencies, and advocated for solutions from the outside. The ABCD Institute, now part of Northwestern University’s School of Education and Social Policy, is built upon three decades of community development research conducted by John Kretzmann and John McKnight, and emphasizes the critical importance of beginning the development process by discovering and mobilizing the resources and strengths, or assets, to be found in even the most challenged communities.
The Institute grew out of a project that evaluated the interrelationships of local associations, enterprises, and nonprofit organizations in cities around the country, and the effect of large public and private system policies upon their functions.
Finding were reported in the well-known book, Building Communities from the Inside

Out: A Path towards Finding and Mobilizing a Community’s Assets.
Today in hundreds of communities across five continents, ABCD initiatives focus on identifying and utilizing the assets of a community – which include the skills of local residents, the power of local associations, the resources of public, private and nonprofit institutions, and the physical and economic resources of local places so the community itself can respond to its own needs and issues.
The work of the ABCD Institute – spreading the lessons learned and working with colleagues worldwide to explore new strategies which effectively develop struggling communities - is carried out through two major approaches. First, the Institute produces and distributes popular publications which share the strategies and approaches used by communities that recognize and mobilize their assets for effective development results (see the list of publications attached). Most of these publications document the accomplishments, and the strategies which led to these successes, of struggling African American and Latino urban communities, and of rural communities which have been left behind.
Second, the Institute is composed of a talented and diverse ABCD “adjunct faculty”, all of whom are dedicated to communicating asset-focused approaches to community building through the provision of technical assistance and training.
These 33 ABCD Institute colleagues cover 16 states, as well as Canada and Italy.
They work in a variety of organizational settings, including government, education, community organizing and development, funders and universities. About half are women and a third - including some of the most active ABCD leaders – are people of color. These powerful African American, Latino and Asian American leaders have been crucial in developing and spreading asset-focused approaches to successful and sustainable community development.

ABCD Adjunct Faculty Members
1. Paul Arntson Evanston, IL Northwestern University

2. Michael Bennett Chicago, IL DePaul Urban Egan Center

3. Irene Brown La Palma, CA BP Foundation

4. Rev. James Conn Santa Monica, CA Methodist Urban Strategy

5. Tom Dewar Bologna, Italy University of Bologna

6. Jim Diers Seattle WA South Downtown Foundation

7. Dan Duncan Tucson, AZ United Way of Tucson & So. Arizona

8. Al Etmanski Vancouver, Canada Planned Lifetime Advocacy Network

9. John Fish Chicago, IL Princeton Project 55

10. Janis Foster Hallettsville, TX Neighborhood Small Grants Network

11. Bob Francis Bridgeport, CT RYASAP

12. Mike Green Denver, CO ABCD Training Group

13. Terry Grundy Cincinnati, OH United Way and Community Chest

14. Lisa Hadden Saginaw, MI Healthy Community Partners

15. Terry L. Holley Knoxville, TN East Tennessee Foundation

16. Karen Lehman Golden Valley, MN Leadership Consulting & Coaching

17. Rev. Craig J. Lewis Minneapolis, MN Church & Community Development Consultant

18. Diane Littlefield Sacramento, CA Health and Community Development Consultant

19. Rev. Damon Lynch Cincinnati, OH New Prospect Baptist Church

20. Bernie Mazyck Charleston, SC SC Association of CDC’s

21. Henry Moore Savannah, GA ABCD Training Group

22. Tom Mosgaller Madison, WI Marshall Erdmann and Associates

23. Mary Nelson Chicago, IL Bethel New Life

24. Michelle Obama Chicago, IL University of Chicago Hospitals

25. Deborah Puntenney Evanston, IL Nonprofit and Community

Development Consultant

26. Frank I. Sanchez Roswell, NM Needmor Foundation

27. Paul Schmitz Milwaukee, WI Public Allies

28. Geralyn Sheehan Northfield, MN Organizational and Community Development Consultant

29. Judith Snow Ontario, Canada Consultant on Community Development & People with Disabilities

30. Luther Snow Decorah, IA Rural and Faith Based Community Development Consultant

31. Richard Townsell Chicago, IL Lawndale Christian Development Corporation

32. Byron P. White Cincinnati, OH Community Building Institute, Xavier University

33. Dianne Williams Little Rock, AR Organizational and Community Development Consultant


ABCD Institute Publications
"Building Communities from the Inside Out: A Path Toward Finding and

Mobilizing a Community's Assets," written by John P. Kretzmann and John L.

McKnight
Workbooks
A Guide to Mapping and Mobilizing the Economic Capacities of Local Residents – presents a model for exploring how individuals make choices about their purchases, and about how much they spend on specific items. Written by John Kretzmann, John McKnight and Deborah Puntenney (1996).
A Guide to Mapping Local Business Assets and Mobilizing Local Business

Capacities – outlines a plan for learning about the businesses in a community and how they can be mobilized in community development efforts. Written by John Kretzmann, John McKnight, and Deborah Puntenney (1996).
A Guide to Mapping Consumer Expenditures and Mobilizing Consumer

Expenditure Capacities – provides instructions for identifying and mobilizing the marketable capacities and skills of local residents. Written by John Kretzmann, John McKnight, and Deborah Puntenney (1996).
A Guide to Capacity Inventories: Mobilizing the Community Skills of Local

Residents – provides clear examples of how eleven communities across the United States developed and used capacity inventories for community building and offers valuable tips for conducting and using capacity inventories in your community. Written by John Kretzmann, John McKnight, and Geralyn Sheehan, with Mike Green and Deborah Puntenney (1997).
A Guide to Evaluating Asset-Based Community Development: Lessons, Challenges, and Opportunities – explores the challenges involved in evaluating community building activity and suggests some promising ways to document the progress and draw out the lessons being learned. Written by Tom Dewar (1997).
A Guide to Creating a Neighborhood Information Exchange: Building Communities by Connecting Local Skills and Knowledge – presents a simple method for sharing local resources among community members through the operation of a capacity listing-and-referral service operated by volunteers on a minimal budget. Written by John Kretzmann, John McKnight and Deborah Puntenney (1998).
City-Sponsored Community Building: Savannah's Grants for Blocks Story – illustrates how a city’s resident controlled small grants program enabled citizens to design and implement projects to improve their neighborhoods. Written by Deborah Puntenney and Henry Moore (1998).
A Guide to Mapping and Mobilizing the Associations in Local Neighborhoods - outlines steps for collecting and organizing information about neighborhood citizen associations and for identifying and using their potential to build better communities. Written by Nicol Turner, John McKnight, and John Kretzmann (1999).
Leading by Stepping Back: A Guide for City Officials on Building Neighborhood

Capacity – describes how Savannah created a citizen-centered government that allows it to work with local residents to improve troubled neighborhoods and build a stronger community. Written by Henry Moore and Deborah Puntenney (1999).
The Organization of Hope: A Workbook for Rural Asset-Based Community

Development – shares a set of stories and lessons meant to spread the good news that the asset-based approach is working in rural communities. Written by Luther Snow (2001).
Community Transformation: Turning Threats into Opportunities presents the stories of eight communities that transformed economic threats into opportunities by mobilizing local people to work together to overcome obstacles and build stronger economies. Written by Luther Snow with the assistance of Uchenna Ukaegbu (2001).
Asset-Based Strategies for Faith Communities – reports the stories of a variety of faith-based initiatives that have increased the well being of both congregations and their communities. Written by Susan Rans and Hilary Altman (2002).
Building the Mercado Central: Asset-Based Development and Community

Entrepreneurship – describes how asset-focused and community organizing approaches were combined to unleash the economic power of Minneapolis’ immigrant Latino community. Written by Geralyn Sheehan (2003).
Related Publication
A Guide to Building Sustainable Organizations from the Inside Out: An

Organizational Capacity Building Toolbox from the Chicago Foundation for

Women – provides a set of definitions and tools for evaluating and increasing the sustainability of organizations using asset-based development principles and methods. Written by Deborah Puntenney (2000). * For additional information and resources on the asset-based approach, please visit the Asset-Based Community Development Institute’s web site www.northwestern.edu/ipr/abcd.html



A Community Building Workbook ©2005 Asset-Based Community Development Institute




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