Página principal

Grade 11 american literature ela ccgps unit plan 4th nine weeks this unit is provided as a sample of available resources and tasks; it is for informational purposes only


Descargar 365.33 Kb.
Página1/9
Fecha de conversión18.07.2016
Tamaño365.33 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9




GRADE 11 AMERICAN LITERATURE

ELA CCGPS UNIT PLAN 4th NINE WEEKS
This unit is provided as a sample of available resources and tasks; it is for informational purposes only. It is your responsibility to investigate the resources listed here to determine their value and appropriateness for your district. GaDOE does not endorse or recommend the purchase or use of any particular resource.



READING FOCUS : Informational
THEME: Modern Times, Modern Issues


Extended Text: Freakonomics, Steven D. Levitt & Stephen J. Dubner
SHORT TEXTS LITERARY:

“The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” by T.S. Eliot



http://www.bartleby.com/198/1.html
“Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?” written in 1931 by lyricist E. Y. "Yip" Harburg

http://www.library.csi.cuny.edu/dept/history/lavender/cherries.html
“A Worn Path” by Eudora Welty

http://xroads.virginia.edu/~drbr/ew_path.html
“Two Soldiers” by William Faulkner

http://literaturesave2.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/william-faulkner-two-soldiers.pdf
“The Life You Save May Be Your Own” by Flannery O’Connor

http://faculty.smu.edu/nschwart/2312/lifeyousave.htm

“My Papa’s Waltz” by Theodore Roethke



http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/my-papa-s-waltz/
“The Beginnings of Violence” by Joanne Leedom-Ackerman

http://joanneleedom-ackerman.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/anthology-beginningofviolence.pdf
“The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson

http://www.americanliterature.com/Jackson/SS/TheLottery.html
“Miriam” by Truman Capote

http://members.multimania.co.uk/shortstories/capotemiriam.html
Chapter 1 from The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien

www.teacherweb.com/.../OBrien-Tim---The-Things-They-Carried-Text.doc
“Knoxville, Tennesse”, “Nikki-Rosa”, “The Drum” by Nikki Giovanni

http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/knoxville-tennessee/

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/art/blog/2010/11/weekly-poem-nikki-rosa.html

http://www.eggplant.org/pdf/poetry/drum_giovanni.pdf
“We Didn’t Start the Fire” by Billy Joel

http://www.metrolyrics.com/we-didnt-start-the-fire-lyrics-billy-joel.html

SHORT TEXTS INFORMATIONAL:

“A Depression-Era Anthem for Our Times”, NPR



http://www.npr.org/2008/11/15/96654742/a-depression-era-anthem-for-our-times
Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech by William Faulkner

http://www.rjgeib.com/thoughts/faulkner/faulkner.html
Inaugural Address of John F. Kennedy

http://voicesofdemocracy.umd.edu/kennedy-inaugural-address-speech-text/

"Letter from a Birmingham Jail" by Martin Luther King, Jr.


http://www.africa.upenn.edu/Articles_Gen/Letter_Birmingham.html
Mailgrams written and distributed by the U.S. Government

http://www.catholicpeacefellowship.org/downloads/mailgram_front.pdf

http://www.catholicpeacefellowship.org/downloads/mailgram_back.pdf
Freakonomics Instructor’s Manual

http://files.harpercollins.com/OMM/freakonomics_teaching_materials.html
“Where Freakonomics Errs” by Steven Malanga

http://www.city-journal.org/html/eon_07_11_05sm.html
“’Freakonomics': Everything He Always Wanted to Know” by Jim Holt

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/05/15/books/review/15HOLTL.html?pagewanted=all

VISUAL AND OTHER TEXTS:

“The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” by T.S. Eliot, performed by Sir Anthony Hopkins



http://www.poetryoutloud.org/poems-and-performance/listen-to-poetry
“Depression Photo Essay” from University of Illinois

http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/depression/photoessay.htm
“Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?” written in 1931 by lyricist E. Y. "Yip" Harburg, performed by Bing Crosby

http://www.bing.com/music/songs/search?q=Brother%2c+Can+You+Spare+a+Dime&songID=A94D0800-0100-11DB-89CA-0019B92A3933&qpvt=Brother%2c+Can+You+Spare+a+Dime&FORM=DTPMUA
Interview with Eudora Welty

http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?title=Interview_with_Eudora_Welty&video_id=186852
Video of Inaugural Address of John F. Kennedy

http://voicesofdemocracy.umd.edu/deliberative-topics/u-s-internationalism-2/john-f-kennedy-inaugural-address-20-january-1961/
“Life of John F. Kennedy” sponsored by the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum

http://www.jfklibrary.org/JFK/Life-of-John-F-Kennedy.aspx
“Campaign of 1960” sponsored by the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum

http://www.jfklibrary.org/JFK/JFK-in-History/Campaign-of-1960?p=2
The Matrix, 1999 film clip (Rated PG-13). Directors: Andy Wachowski, Lana Wachowski
“We Didn’t Start the Fire” written and performed by Billy Joel

www.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DPIMU_HKsCjw&ctbm=vid&ei=fD5rT72aMKuDsgKP0-HpBQ&usg=AFQjCNEUVefOVoaPSowDGP3LfGRwTBhVgg&cad=rja
Freakonomics, 2010 film (Rated PG-13). Directors: Heidi Ewing, Alex Gibney, Seth Gordon, Rachel Grady, Eugene Jarecki, Morgan Spurlock


WRITING FOCUS: Argumentative

ASSESSMENT TASKS (These writing prompts will serve as the assessments for this unit.)

Informative/Explanatory writing should focus on why literary and rhetorical choices are made by the author, and how those choices are intended to affect or impact the reader based solidly in text evidence; argumentative/opinion writing must advance a specific claim or claim(s) and provide strong and logical support, based solidly in text, for claims.

1. ARGUMENTATIVE: In his 1950 Nobel Prize acceptance speech, William Faulkner expressed his concern that writers are veering away from discussing what he considers to be the most significant aspects of humanity: love, honor, pity, pride, compassion, and sacrifice. Students should determine whether or not they agree with Faulkner’s statement. Then using specific references to a text of their choosing, students will defend their position on Faulkner’s claims.
2. ARGUMENTATIVE: In his inaugural address, John F. Kennedy asserts that America is a champion of freedom. Contrarily, in his letter from Birmingham City Jail, Martin Luther King Jr. states that freedom is the legacy left for all Americans, yet it is not experienced as such. Students will evaluate the statements of both leaders and determine the methods of persuasion used by each man, as well as his motivation. Students will then defend their position on which work is more compelling to its cause. Students should evaluate the authors’ use of literary devices, including antitheses, parallelism, and tone.
3. ARGUMENTATIVE: Students will synthesize and evaluate materials from throughout the Postmodern period to addresses a central theme of their choice (i.e. the importance of knowledge; changes in contemporary American culture & values; social stratification in American society, etc.). They will choose 3-5 works to demonstrate a connection that speaks to how Postmodern authors address their subject (i.e. Are they persuasive, analytical, informative, etc. Why is their work presented in this fashion? Are they effective in their purpose?). Students may complete this task as a writing assignment, a presentation, or any other method the teacher deems appropriate.
4. ARGUMENTATIVE: Critics of Steven D. Levitt & Stephen J. Dubner’s Freakonomics argue that the book is not actually about economics at all, but rather the writers’ own socio- and criminological reports. Others argue that the authors are making economic principles more accessible and interesting to a broader population. Students will determine which perspective they agree with and then, using literary criticisms for support, persuade their audiences of the accuracy of their claims. Students should work with advanced software, including options such as Prezi.com or Timetoast.com to prepare a presentation. The final product must contain visuals and pertinent sound, and will be presented before the class. The final piece of the work must be an MLA formatted bibliography of the criticisms and sources used to complete the project.


NARRATIVE/RESEARCH/ROUTINE WRITING

NARRATIVE

1. After reading “Brother, Can You Spare a Dime”, students will examine a time in their lives when they felt unappreciated. They will elaborate on this in a personal narrative. Students should discuss what it feels like to be devalued, how they responded to the situation, and how it has affected them. They should also comment on the experiences of the speaker, drawing parallels between his emotions and their own in order to demonstrate a connection to the text.


2. Students will research an assigned topic and create a script to perform in front of the class that provides the other students with information. They will act as a typical 1950s family at the dinner table, holding a conversation on what they have researched. All members of the group must participate in the writing and the conversation. They must research their topic from different angles in order to appear as a real familial discussion. Remind students that they do not always agree with their parents, and teenagers of the 1950s were no different.
3. Have students write a letter to the editor of a major newspaper regarding a legal issue about which they feel strongly. They should make logical, emotional, and ethical appeals to the reader and support each of their claims with at least two examples or reasons. Students should use proper letter-writing format, grammar, spelling, etc.
4. Students should pretend that they have been elected Student Body President at school. They will give their inaugural speeches before the class, persuading students to get involved in the school and provide their support. Students will complete these steps to write their own persuasive speeches.

  • Write your introductory statement. This is the first sentence in your opening paragraph. It should state the main idea of your speech, and grab the listener’s attention. (Example: Over the next two years, students here can expect some exciting changes at our school!)

  • Mention each of the points you will be discussing in your speech. These points should be the ideas discussed in the opening portion of the class.

  • Write the body of your speech. This is where you explain how you’ll put your ideas into action. Set aside one paragraph for each of your three ideas

  • Write the conclusion. End your speech by reviewing your ideas. Let them know that you will do your best to achieve great things with their help. Leave your audience with an inspirational last sentence.




RESEARCH CONNECTION(S)

  • The Great Depression

  • The Dust Bowl

  • World Wars I & II

  • John F. Kennedy

  • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

  • The Vietnam War

  • Civil Rights Movement

  • Principles of economics

  • Dot-com bubble and bust




ROUTINE WRITING Notes, summaries, process journals, and short responses across all genres


  • Annotate texts as they are read (Give students a purpose in this. Tell them what to be looking for as they are reading.)

  • Journal entries on given topics

  • Claims & Warrants slips (Have students make a claim about something that they have read and then support it using one or two lines of text. A 1-2 sentences explanation should accompany this.)

  • Cornell notes

  • Daily response prompts

  • Predictions made on texts

  • Reviews of pieces read in class

  • Peer editing with written feedback (Have students make editorial corrections, but also evaluate their partners work. They should leave a 3-5 sentence evaluation of a peer’s paper, detailing at least one strength and two weaknesses that need to be addressed.)






PLANS FOR ASSESSMENT 1: integrating reading selections from the unit into a writing task

ARGUMENTATIVE/OPINION: In his 1950 Nobel Prize acceptance speech, William Faulkner expressed his concern that writers are veering away from discussing what he considers to be the most significant aspects of humanity: love, honor, pity, pride, compassion, and sacrifice. Students should determine whether or not they agree with Faulkner’s statement. Then using specific references to a text of their choosing, students will defend their position on Faulkner’s claims.

SKILL BUILDING TASKS Note: tasks may take more than a single day.

Include a task to teach EVERY skill students will need to succeed on the assessment prompt above. Language, Foundations, and Speaking/Listening standards must be incorporated so that all standards are adequately addressed throughout the year.

ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How does understanding historical context deepen a reader’s comprehension of a text?

TASK: pre-reading

Standards:

RI.11-12.7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.

W.11-12.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes

SL.11-12.2. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.

L.11-12.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.


Instruction:

  • Have students begin a new notebook section for Unit 4. Establish a heading, including date and title. This section of notes will be general information on The Modern Period (http://staff.edmonds.wednet.edu/users/hansonk/LITERARY%20PERIODS%20AND%20THEIR%20CHARACTERISTICS.htm).

  • Begin with a bell ringer. Have students write out three significant changes that occurred in America between 1917 and 1964.

  • Ask students to define the term “modern”. What topics do they think of when they hear the term? Answers may include technology, machinery, medicine, law, etc.

  • Choose five of the topics that students associate with the term and then split them into groups. Have each group explore each of their assigned topics using preselected resources.

  • Students will report back to the class on three key events that occurred within the time period and selected topic.

  • Ask them to journal about what they think life would be like without the changes that they researched.

  • Discuss how these changes affect society today.

  • Provide students with background information on The Great Depression through a multi-media presentation to model use of technology.




ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How does poetry reflect our culture?

TASK: understanding modernist poetry

Standards:

RL.11-12.10. By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 11–CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

W.11-12.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

a. Apply grades 11–12 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics”).

SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.


  1. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

L.11-12.6. Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
Instruction:

  • Ask students to brainstorm all that they know about poetry. Give them a blank sheet of paper, and tell them to write down all that they can think of (i.e.: poetic devices, vocabulary, authors, types of poetry, periods, etc.)

  • Explain that many of the ideas that they have listed arise in modern poetry. Provide several books of modern poetry and ask students to partner up and look through them. Students should select one poem that they like to share with the class.

  • After students have shared their favorites with the class, provide students with direct instruction on Modernism. Have students take notes on where the movement rose from, how and when it started, and what it entails in terms of literature and style. (http://staff.edmonds.wednet.edu/users/hansonk/LITERARY%20PERIODS%20AND%20THEIR%20CHARACTERISTICS.htm)




ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How does figurative language create meaning in poetry?

TASK: analyzing and evaluating modernist poetry

Standards:

RL.11-12.5. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

RL.11-12.6. Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).

W.11-12.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

a. Apply grades 11–12 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics”).

SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.



  1. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

  2. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

  3. Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.

  4. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

L.11-12.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.11-12.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.


Instruction:

  • Ask students to recall previous “love” poems that they have read in class or on their own. List the titles on the board.

  • Have students brainstorm on the topic of what makes a poem a “love” poem. Write down their ideas next to the list of titles they came up with.

EXAMPLE:



Love Poems
“How Do I Love Thee”

“To My Dear and Loving Husband”

“Annabel Lee”

“Celestial Love”




Elements of “Love” Poetry
Mentions love

Talks about beauty

About women

Uses “heart” a lot






  • Pass out copies of “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” and explain to students that it is a modern poem.

  • Listen to the reading done by Sir Anthony Hopkins. Ask the students to focus on the tone that he uses as he reads.

  • Discuss the performance and then read aloud together, stopping after each stanza to check for comprehension.

  • Have students annotate each stanza as you read.

  • Split into groups and assign each group a stanza of the poem to work with. Ask them to annotate their stanza and identify at least two poetic devices used in their section. Remind them that poets often use mood and tone to influence and shape a reader’s perception.

  • After students have identified the devices, ask them to analyze and evaluate the author’s purpose in using it.

  • What might he have been trying to convey to readers?

  • Why did he choose to use this particular device over another method?

  • Was it effective in his intentions?

  • Could this be considered a “love” poem? Why or why not?

  • Bring students back together to discuss their analysis and evaluations.

*Assessment Opportunity


  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9


La base de datos está protegida por derechos de autor ©espanito.com 2016
enviar mensaje