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Los Angeles Community College District
COURSE OUTLINE
SECTION I: Basic Course Information

This is a:



New Course



Addition of District Course

x

Update



Reinstatement




  1. COLLEGE: LAMC



  1. SUBJECT (DISCIPLINE) NAME1 (40 characters, no abbreviations): Spanish




  1. COURSE NUMBER: 3




  1. COURSE TITLE: Intermediate Spanish I




  1. UNITS: 5




  1. CATALOG COURSE DESCRIPTION -- Provide a description of the course, including an overview of the topics covered, maximum forty words:




Review and development of grammatical concepts learned in previous courses. Amplification of vocabulary and practice in composition. Introduction to literature and further study of culture and civilization through short stories.




  1. CLASS SCHEDULE COURSE DESCRIPTION -- Provide a brief description of the course, including an overview of the topics covered:




Review and development of grammatical concepts learned in previous courses. Amplification of vocabulary and practice in composition. Introduction to literature and further study of culture and civilization through short stories






  1. COLLEGE APPROVAL DATE:      




  1. UPDATES (check all applicable boxes):



X Content Last Update: 1/18/91

X Objectives Last Update: 1/18/91

 College Specific Course Attributes/Data Elements Last Update:      

 Districtwide Course Attributes/Data Elements Last Update:      

 Other (describe) Last Update:      


     




  1. CLASS HOURS:







Hours per week (based on 18 weeks)

Total Hours per term (hrs per week x 18)

Units

Lecture:

5

90

5

Lab/activity (w/ homework):

0

0

   

Lab/activity (w/o homework):

     

     

   

Total:

5

90

5


Note: The Carnegie Rule and Title 5, section 55002 sets forth the following minimum standards: 1 unit = 1 hour lecture per week, 2 hours homework per week; OR 2 hours per week of lab with homework; OR 3 hours of lab per week without homework. The hours per week are based on a standard 18-week calendar. Lecture also includes discussion and/or demonstration hours, laboratory includes activity and/or studio hours.


  1. PREREQUISITES, COREQUISITES, ADVISORIES ON RECOMMENDED PREPARATION, and LIMITATION ON ENROLLMENT


Note: The LACCD’s Policy on Prerequisites, Corequisites and Advisories requires that the curriculum committee take a separate action verifying that a course’s prerequisite, corequisite or advisory is an “appropriate and rational measure of a student’s readiness to enter the course or program” and that the prerequisite, corequisite or advisory meets the level of scrutiny delineated in the policy.

Prerequisites: yes (If yes, complete information below)







Subject

Number

Course Title

Units

Validation Approval Date (for official use only)




Spanish

2

Elementary Spanish 2

5

     



     

     

     

     

     



     

     

     

     

     



     

     

     

     

     

Corequisite:  (If yes, complete information below)







Subject

Number

Course Title

Units

Validation Approval Date (for official use only)




     

     

     

     

     



     

     

     

     

     



     

     

     

     

     



     

     

     

     

     

Advisories:  (If yes, complete information below)







Subject

Number

Course Title

Units

Validation Approval Date (for official use only)




     

     

     

     

     



     

     

     

     

     



     

     

     

     

     



     

     

     

     

     



  1. OTHER LIMITATIONS ON ENROLLMENT (see Title 5, section 58106 and Board Rule 6803 for policy on allowable limitations. Other appropriate statutory or regulatory requirements may also apply):




     


SECTION II: Course Content and Objectives


  1. COURSE CONTENT AND OBJECTIVES:




COURSE CONTENT AND SCOPE –Lecture:

If applicable, outline the topics included in the lecture portion of the course (Outline reflects course description, all topics covered in class).

Hours per topic

COURSE OBJECTIVES - Lecture (If applicable):

upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to… (Use action verbs – see Bloom’s Taxonomy below for “action verbs requiring cognitive outcomes.”)



Topic 1

Culture: The Chicanos: short biographies of Cesar Chavez, Sandra Cisneros, Edward James Olmos; Chicano cinema; three centuries of continuous Chicano presence in the United States; the Mexicans of Chicago; author Francisco X. Alarcon; reading: Consejos de una madre; young people's poetry

Literary analysis: verses, stanzas, intonation and recitation

Structure: Gender and number agreement of nouns and articles; use of articles; contraction of articles; forms and uses of the present indicative of regular verbs of all three conjugational patterns


Topic 2

Culture: The Puerto Ricans: short biographies of Antonia Novello, Tito Puente, and Jennifer Lopez; Puerto Rican writers; Puerto Ricans in the U. S.; the debate over statehood, independence or remaining a U. S. possession; author Esmeralda Santiago; reading: Cuando era puertorriquena; exploration of websites about Puerto Rico

Literary Analysis: Biographies and autobiographies

Structure: Forms and uses of the present indicative of verbs of all three conjugational patterns that have vowel changes in the root and also of those having orthographic changes; forms and uses of verbs that are irregular in the present indicative


Topic 3

Culture: Cuban-Americans and Dominicans: short biographies Gloria Estefan, Andy Garcia, Julia Alvarez and Junot Diaz; Caribbean singers in the U.S.; the success of Cuban-Americans in exile; the ongoing effort of Dominicans to acculturate to North American life; Cuban author Cristina Garcia; reading: "Sonar en cubano"; exploration of websites about Cubans and Dominicans in the U.S.

Structure: descriptive adjectives, agreement, position of adjectives, use of the neuter article lo, uses of the verbs ser and estar
Topic 4

Culture: Central Americans: short biographies of Mary Rodas, Jose Solano, and Claudia Smith; gourmet cooking of Central America; aspirations of Central Americans and the challenges facing them; author Jorge Argueta; reading: Esperanza muere en Los Angeles; exploration of websites about Central America.

Literary analysis: characters and narration

Structure: the comparative degree; the superlative degree; demonstrative adjectives and pronouns

Topic 5

Culture: Spain: short biographies of King Juan Carlos I, Penelope Cruz and Pedro Almodovar; masterpieces of Spanish art; Spain's reconciliation with the modern world; author Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; selections from Don Quijote de la Mancha; exploration of websites about Spain



Literary analysis: Perspective

Structure: the regular forms of the preterite tense


Topic 6

Culture: Mexico: short biographies of Mexicans Elena Poniatowska, Octavio Paz and Luis Miguel; the diet of precolumbian Meso-Americans; shopping in an open-air market, Mexico: a land of contrasts; Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo: the most talented couple in Mexico; author Guillermo Samperio; reading: Tiempo libre; exploration of websites about Mexico

Literary analysis: Transformation

Structure: direct and indirect object pronouns and the personal a; the verb gustar and verbs using the same construction as gustar

Topic 7

Culture: Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic: short biographies of Rosario Ferre, Ricky Martin, Juan Luis Guerra and Sammy Sosa; baseball and other sports in the Caribbean; various perspectives on the history of Puerto Rico; the Dominican Republic as the cradle of America; author Virglio Dias Grullon; reading: El diario inconcluso; exploration of websites about Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic



Literary Analysis: Time and chronology

Structure: preterite forms of verbs with changes in the stem; preterite forms of rhizotonic verbs; irregular preterite forms


Topic 8

Culture: Cuba: short biographies of Nicolas Guillen, Nancy Morejon and Wilfredo Lam; music and dance in Cuba; a brief history of Cuba; the Cuban revolution at the crossroads; author Jose Marti; reading: Versos sencillos; exploration of websites about Cuba

Literary analysis: Rhyme patterns

Structure: forms and uses of the imperfect tense; indefinite and negative expressions

Topic 9

Culture: Nicaragua: short biographies of Sergio Ramirez, Daisy Zamora and Ernesto Cardenal; means of transportation in Nicaragua; the reconstruction of Nicaragua; Nicaragua: land of poets; author Ruben Dario; reading: A Margarita Debayle; exploration of websites about Nicaragua



Literary analysis: The fairy tale

Structure: comparison of the uses of the preterite and imperfect tenses: completed and background actions

Topic 10

Culture: Honduras: short biographies of Roberto Sosa, Clementina Suarez and Max Hernandez; multinational companies and the global economy; aspirations for the development of Honduras; the cultivation of bananas as an economic base; author Jose Adan Castelar; reading: Paz del solvente; exploration of websites about Honduras

Literary analysis: Modern poetry: verses in visual form

Structure: comparison of the uses of the preterite and imperfect tenses: simultaneous and recurrent actions


Topic 11

Culture: El Salvador: short biographies of Jose Roberto Cea, Claribel Alegria and Juan Carlos Colorado; politics in Latin America; El Salvador's search for peace; author Manlio Argueta; reading: Los perros magicos de los volcanes; exploration of websites about El Salvador

Literary analysis: Legend and symbolism

Structure: comparison of the uses of the prepostions para and por

Topic 12

Culture: Guatemala: short biographies of Miguel Angel Asturias, Delia Quinonez and Luis Gonzalez Palma; human rights in Guatemala; a short history of Guatemala; author Rigoberta Menchu Tum; reading: Me llamo Rigoberta Menchu y asi me nacio la conciencia; exploration of websites about Guatemala

Literary analysis: Register and style

Structure: possessive adjectives and pronouns; uses of the infinitive



7

7


7

7

7



7

8

8



8

8

8



8

Compare the life experiences of three renowned Mexican-Americans.

Analyze a poem with regard to its verses and stanzas.

Evaluate appropriate intonational patterns for recitation.

Examine rules for constructing well-formed noun phrases.

Categorize present tense verbs according to their conjugational patterns

Contrast the lives of three famous Puerto Ricans.

Debate the political status of Puerto Rico.

Judge the effect living in the U.S. has on Puerto Rican children.

Compose a biography and an autobiography.

Categorize verbs with irregularities for ease of access.

Evaluate the experience of three Cuban-Americans.

Analyze elements of Caribbean music and assess their effect on popular music in the U.S.

Contrast the acculturation patterns of Cuban-Americans with those of Dominican-Americans. Choose appropriate forms of adjectives and construct noun phrases by positioning them correctly.

Formulate sentences using the neuter lo. Distinguish among the uses of the verbs ser and estar for accuracy of expression.

Examine the lives of three well-known Central Americans.

Design a menu for a meal featuring Central American cuisine.

Prepare a Central American dish.

Propose solutions for problems facing Central Americans.

Examine character development and narration. Compare entities using the comparative and superlative degrees.

Differentiate distances using demonstrative adjectives and pronouns.
Inspect the lives of three famous Spaniards. Examine examples of Spanish painting.

Appraise the effect of the return to democracy on life in Spain and Spain's relations with other countries.

Relate the writings of Cervantes to his era and circumstances.

Compose essays from different perspectives. Organize regular preterite verb forms for ease of access.

Compare the life experiences of three well- known Mexicans.

Inspect the diet of indigenous peoples of Mexico.

Collect vocabulary necessary for shopping in open-air markets.

Debate the advantages and disadvantages of shopping in open-air markets and shopping in supermarkets.

Examine the artistry of Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo.

Compose a short story featuring the transformation of a character.

Formulate sentences that require pronominalized indirect objects.

Compare the structure of sentences containing gustar with sentences containing to like in English.

Create a list of verbs which act like gustar.

Contrast the lives of three celebrities from this area.

Assess the effect of sports such as baseball and soccer on this region.

Debate the historians' interpretations of the history of Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.

Compose a short story emphasizing time and chronology.

Construct sentences in past time using verbs that have orthographic or other irregularities in the preterite tense.


Evaluate the life experiences of three renowned Cubans living in Cuba.

Analyze elements of Cuban music and assess their effect on popular music in the U.S.

Debate interpretations of the history of Cuba. Examine the reasons why Castro's revolution was successful.

Question thefuture of communism in Cuba. Compose a poem following one of the rhyme patterns.

Formulate sentences in past time using the imperfect tense to indicate background states and actions and habitual events.

Contrast opposites by employing indefinite and negative expressions such as someone/no one, something/nothing.

Examine the lives of three well-known Nicaraguans.

Assemble vocabulary for discussion of means of transportation.

Debate factors involved in the rebuilding of Nicaragua after decades of political and economic turmoil.

Compose a fairy tale.

Distinguish among actions and states when narrating in past time in order to choose either the preterite or the imperfect each time a verb is used in a sentence

Inspect the lives of three famous Hondurans. Debate the advantages and disadvantages of various national and international economic plans.

Assess the potential Honduras has for diversifying its agricultural production.

Compose a poem with its verses arranged in patterns on the page.

Distinguish among completed events, ongoing events, and habitual events when narrating in past time in order to choose either the preterite or the imperfect each time a verb is used.

Compare the life experiences of three renowned Salvadorans.

Examine Latin American political currents. Contrast El Salvador's search for peace with that of Nicaragua.

Compose a short legend.

Select either the preposition para or the preposition por in any given situation for precision of expression.


Contrast the lives of three famous Guatemalans. Evaluate the status of human rights in Guatemala and other Latin American nations. Question the roles of foreign powers in the history of Guatemala.

Evaluate Rigoberta Menchu's interpretation of the ongoing struggle of Guatemalans for their rights.

Compose an essay in the vivid style of Menchu. Construct sentences with possessive adjectives and pronouns focusing on gender and number agreement and degree of distance.

Formulate sentences using the infinitive as the head of a verb phrase containing a modal or modal-like verb and also as gerund or verbal noun.


Total lecture hours*

90







COURSE CONTENT AND SCOPE -- Laboratory:

If applicable, outline the topics included in the laboratory portion of the course (Outline reflects course description, all topics covered in class).

Hours per topic

COURSE OBJECTIVES - Laboratory (If applicable):

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to… (Use action verbs – see Bloom’s Taxonomy below for “action verbs requiring cognitive outcomes.”)2



     

     

     

Total lab hours*

     



*Total lecture and laboratory hours (which includes the final examination) must equal totals on page 1.


Bloom’s Taxonomy


simple skills <<------------------------------->> complex skills




Critical Thinking

Knowledge

define
repeat


record
list
recall
name
relate
underline


Comprehension

translate


restate
discuss
describe
recognize
explain
express
identify
locate
report
review
tell


Application

interpret


apply
employ
use
demonstrate
dramatize
practice
illustrate
operate
schedule
shop
sketch


Analysis

Distinguish


analyze
differentiate
appraise
calculate
experiment
test
compare
contrast
criticize
diagram
inspect
debate
inventory
question
relate
solve
examine
categorize

Synthesis

compose
plan


propose
design
formulate
arrange
assemble
collect
construct
create
set up
organize
prepare


Evaluation

judge
appraise


evaluate
rate
compare
value
revise
score
select
choose
assess
estimate
measure




  1. REQUIRED TEXTS:

Provide a representative list of textbooks and other required reading; include author, title and date of publication:


Samaniego, Mundo 21, second edition, 2004




  1. SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS:

Reading assignments may include, but are not limited to the following:


Newspapers, short stories, internet, cultural readings regarding Hispanic culture, songs, recipes, magazines such a “People en Espanol”, “Nuestra Gente”




  1. WRITING ASSIGNMENTS:

Title 5, section 55002 requires grades to be “based on demonstrated proficiency in subject matter and the ability to demonstrate that proficiency, at least in part, by means of essays or, in courses where the curriculum committee deems them to be appropriate, by problem solving exercises or skills demonstrations by students.” Writing assignments in this course may include, but are not limited to the following:




Grammar exercises involving questions/answers, short paragraphs, 3 essays with two revisions on topics such as: La comunidad hispana en los Estados Unidos, La influencia italiana en Argentina, El desempleo de hispanos en Los Angeles




  1. REPRESENTATIVE OUTSIDE ASSIGNMENTS:

Out of class assignments may include, but are not limited to the following:


Students will be involved in projects where they have to meet with other students

outside the classroom to prepare oral presentation assignments. Each person in the group has to contribute one part of the assignment and do her/his own investigation regarding the topic chosen. Most of the topics will be related to the political and economic problems of Latin American countries such as Mexico, Argentina, Colombia, Brasil, Haiti and others.






  1. REPRESENTATIVE ASSIGNMENTS THAT DEMONSTRATE CRITICAL THINKING:

Title 5, section 55002(a) requires that a degree applicable course have a level of rigor that includes “critical thinking and the understanding and application of concepts determined by the curriculum committee to be at college level”. Critical thinking may include, but is not limited to analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. Provide examples of assignments that demonstrate critical thinking.




Students will analyze documentaries, travelogues, and other videos dealing with Hispanic cultures and compose written and oral reports based on the information contained in them.




  1. METHODS OF EVALUATION:

Title 5, section 55002 requires grades to be “based on demonstrated proficiency in subject matter and the ability to demonstrate that proficiency, at least in part, by means of essays, or, in courses where the curriculum committee deems them to be appropriate, by problem solving exercises or skills demonstrations by students.” Methods of evaluation may include, but are not limited to the following (please note that evaluation should measure the outcomes detailed “Course Objectives” at the beginning of Section II):




Written exams involving grammar and culture of the various Spanish-speaking countries. Participation in group and pair discussions and problem solving activities. Composition of oral and written reports.




  1. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION:

Methods of instruction may include, but are not limited to the following:

X Lecture

X Discussion

Laboratory

X Activity

 Field Experience

X Independent Study

 Other (explain)









  1. SUPPLIES:

List of supplies the student must provide.




Textbook, pen pencil, paper, Spanish/English dictionary.




  1. COMPUTER COMPETENCY:

If applicable, explain how computer competency is included in the course.




Students will be expected to search Spanish web sites for research projects.     




  1. INFORMATION COMPETENCY:

Information competency is the ability to find, evaluate use, and communicate information in all its various formats. It combines aspects of library literacy, research methods and technological literacy, Information competency includes consideration of the ethical and legal implications and requires the application of both critical thinking and communications skills. If applicable, explain how information competency is included in the course.




Students will be expected to do Internet searches and to communicate with students in other countries via the internet to further practice the language.



  1. DIVERSITY:

If applicable, explain how diversity (e.g., cultural, gender, etc.) is included in the course.




The course does not meet cultural diversity requirements.



  1. SCANS COMPETENCIES (required for all courses with vocational TOP Codes; recommended for all courses):

SCANS (Secretary’s Commission on Necessary Skills) are skills the Department of Labor identified, in consultation with business and industry leaders, which reflect the skills necessary for success in the workplace. Check the appropriate boxes to indicate the areas where students will develop the following skills (please note that all SCANS competencies do not apply to all courses):


RESOURCES
 Managing Time: Selecting relevant goal-related activities, ranks them in order of importance, allocating time to activities, and understanding, preparing and following schedules.
 Managing Money: Using or preparing budgets, including making cost and revenue forecasts; keeping detailed records to track budget performance, and making appropriate adjustments.
 Managing Material and Facility Resources: Acquiring, storing, allocating, and distributing materials, supplies, parts, equipment, space or final products in order to make the best use of them.
INTERPERSONAL
X Participating as Member of a Team: Working cooperatively with others and contributing to group’s efforts with ideas, suggestions and effort.
X Teaching Others New Skills: Helping others learn needed knowledge and skills.
X Exercising Leadership: Communicating thoughts, feelings, and ideas to justify a position, encouraging, persuading, convincing or otherwise motivating an individual or group, including responsibly challenging existing procedures, policies or authority.
X Negotiating: Working toward agreement that may involve exchanging specific resources or resolving divergent interests.
XWorking with Cultural Diversity: Working well with men and women and with people from a variety of ethnic, social, or educational backgrounds.
INFORMATION
X Acquiring and Evaluating Information: Identifying a need for data, obtaining the data from existing sources or creating them, and evaluating their relevance and accuracy.
 Organizing and Maintaining Information: Organizing, processing and maintaining written or computerized records and other forms of information in a systematic fashion.
X Interpreting and Communicating Information: Selecting and analyzing information and communicating the results of others, using oral, written, graphic, pictorial, or multimedia methods.
X Using Computers to Process Information: Employing computers to acquire, organize, analyze and communicate information.
SYSTEMS
 Understanding Systems: Knowing how social, organizational and technological systems work and operating effectively with them.
 Monitoring and Correcting Performance: Distinguishing trends, predicting impacts of actions on system operations, diagnosing deviations in the functioning of a system/organization, and taking necessary steps to correct performance.
 Improving or Designs Systems: Making suggestions to modify existing systems in order to improve the quality of products or services and developing new or alternative systems.
TECHNOLOGY
 Selecting Technology: Judging which sets of procedures, tools or machines, including computers and their programs, will produce the desired results.
 Applying Technology to Tasks: Understanding overall intent and proper procedures for setting up and operating machines, including computers and their reprogramming systems.
 Maintaining and Troubleshooting Equipment: Preventing, identifying, or solving problems with equipment, including computers and other technologies.

Section III: Relationship to College Programs


  1. THIS COURSE WILL BE AN APPROVED REQUIREMENT3 FOR AN APPROVED ASSOCIATE DEGREE OR CERTIFICATE PROGRAM: Yes

If yes, the course will be a portion of the “approved program” listed on the State Chancellor’s Inventory of Approved Programs (approved programs can be found on the State Chancellor’s Office website at http://misweb.cccco.edu/esed/webproginv/prod/invmenu.htm).




AA – Spanish

Note: In order for a course to be approved as a requirement for an associate degree or certificate program, the program must be listed on the State Chancellor’s Office Inventory of Approved Programs AND the course must be listed in the college catalog as either a requirement or an elective for the program. If course is not part of an approved program at the college adopting the course, it will be considered to be a “stand-alone” course, and is subject to the State Chancellor’s approval criteria and the college must complete and submit the Chancellor’s Office “APPLICATION FOR APPROVAL OF CREDIT” form. Certain courses are granted “blanket approval" by the State Chancellor’s Office and do not require approval. See the Chancellor’s Office Program and Course Approval Handbook for details. LACCD Skills Certificates are not State approved programs listed on the Chancellor’s Office Inventory of Approved Programs.




  1. GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ASSOCIATE DEGREE STATUS:

Area requested: C  date:      


If applicable, provide an explanation of how the course meets the General Education parameters for one of the five general education areas – Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Humanities, Language and Rationality, Health and Physical Education -- contained in Board Rule 6201.14 -General Education Requirements

http://marlin.laccd.edu/district/BoardRules_AdmRegs/boardrules.htm


     

2nd Area requested:   date:      


If applicable, provide an explanation of how the course meets General Education parameters for an additional general education area – Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Humanities, Language and Rationality, Health and Physical Education -- contained in Board Rule 6201.14 -General Education Requirements http://marlin.laccd.edu/district/BoardRules_AdmRegs/boardrules.htm


     

Section IV: Articulation Information

(Complete in consultation with College Articulation Officer)


  1. TRANSFER STATUS:




University of California: Yes
UC date:      



California State University: Yes
College date:      




  1. GENERAL EDUCATION FOR TRANSFER:




IGETC Certification:
Area requested: 3B

Date requested:      

IGETC approval date:      
If applicable, provide an explanation of how the course meets the appropriate General Education parameters, as defined in IGETC Certification Guidelines.


CSU Certification:
Area requested: C2

Date requested:      

CSU  date:      
If applicable, provide an explanation of how the course meets the appropriate General Education parameters, as defined in CSU Certification Guidelines.


     

     







2nd Area requested: 

Date requested:      

IGETC  date:      
If applicable, provide an explanation of how the course meets the appropriate General Education parameters, as defined in IGETC Certification Guidelines.


2nd Area requested: 

Date requested:      

CSU C 2 date:      
If applicable, provide an explanation of how the course meets the appropriate General Education parameters, as defined in CSU Certification Guidelines.


     

     



  1. MAJOR REQUIREMENT FOR TRANSFER – Will this course be articulated to meet lower division major requirements? 
CAN NUMBER: Spanish 8 CAN SEQUENCE NUMBER: CAN SEQ B: Spanish 3 & 4
CAN Approval -- Date requested:       Date approved:      


Section V: Supplemental Course Information



  1. DEPARTMENT/DIVISION NAME: English and Foreign Languages




  1. DEPARTMENT/DIVISON CODE: 13




  1. SUBJECT CODE -- 3 characters, assigned by District Office 897




  1. SUBJECT ABBREVIATION -- 7 characters, assigned by District Office Spanish




  1. SPC CODE -- 3 characters, assigned by District Office:    




  1. ABBREVIATION FOR TRANSCRIPTS -- 20 characters, assigned by District Office: Spanish




  1. DEGREE CREDIT: 




  1. CREDIT/NO CREDIT GRADING: 




  1. REPETITIONS -- Number of times course may be repeated for credit (three maximum): 

How does the repetition of this course meet Title 5, section 58161 requirements? A course may be repeatable when, “course content differs each time it is offered, and that the student who repeats it is gaining an expanded educational experience for one of the following reasons: (A) Skills or proficiencies are enhanced by supervised repetition and practice within class periods; or (B) Active participatory experience in individual study or group assignments is the basic means by which learning objectives are obtained.”




     




  1. prior to transferable level – This course attribute applies to English, writing, ESL, reading and mathematics courses ONLY. If applicable, indicate how many levels below the transferable level this course should be placed:





  1. CREDIT BASIC SKILLS -- Title 5, section 55502(d) defines basic skills as “courses in reading, writing, computation, and English as a Second Language, which are designated as non-degree credit courses pursuant to Title 5, section 55002(b)."


 If yes, course must be non-degree applicable


  1. CROSS REFERENCE -- Is this course listed as equivalent in content to existing College/District courses in another discipline?


 If yes, list courses: (documentation of cross-discipline agreement must be provided)


     




  1. COURSE SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES -- Title 5, section 56029 allows a course to be repeatble when continuing success of the students with disabililties is dependent on additional repetitions of a specific class. Is this course designated as an “approved special class” for students with disabilities?



If yes, provide an explanation of how this course meets the requirements of Title 5, section 56029.


     



  1. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION STATUS -- Title 5, section 55252 allows for two types of Cooperative Education: 1) General Work Experience Education -- i.e., supervised employment, which is intended to assist students in acquiring desirable work habits, attitudes and career awareness, which need not be related to the students' educational goals; or 2) Occupational Work Experience Education -- i.e., supervised employment, extending classroom based occupational learning at an on-the-job learning station, which is related to the students' educational or occupational goal. Is this course part of the college’s approved cooperative work experience education program, according to?





  1. COURSE CLASSIFICATION:



Note: A course’s Classification, TOP Code and SAM code must be aligned – e.g., Courses with an “Occupational” Course Classification must have an “Occupational” TOP Code and a SAM Code of A, B, C, or D; courses that do not have an “Occupational” Course Classification cannot have an Occupational TOP Code and must have an “E” SAM Code.


  1. TOP CODE – (6 digits XXXX.XX)     .  

Course content should match discipline description in Taxonomy of Programs found at www.cccco.edu/cccco/esed/curric/curriculum.htm.


  1. SAM CODE (Student Accountability Model)



SAM Codes (see CCC Chancellor’s Office Student Accountability Model Operations Manual, 1984) should be assigned as follows:
Priority "A" – Apprenticeship: Courses designed for an indentured apprentice must have the approval of the State of California, Department of Industrial Relations Department, Division of Apprenticeship Standards.
Priority "B"Advanced Occupational: Courses taken by students in the advanced stages of their occupational programs. Courses should be offered in one specific occupational area only. Priority letter “B” should be assigned sparingly; in most cases, no more than two courses in any one program should be labeled “B.” “B”-level courses must have Priority “C” prerequisites in the same program area.
Priority "C" – Clearly Occupational: Courses generally taken by students in the middle stages of their programs should have a difficulty level sufficient to detract "drop-ins." Courses may be offered in several occupational programs within a broad area. The "C" priority, however, should also be used for courses within a specific program area when the criteria for "B" classification are not met. A "C"-level course should provide the student with entry-level job skills.
Priority "D" -- Possibly Occupational: "D" courses are those taken by students in the beginning stages of their occupational programs. The "D" priority can also be used for service (or survey) courses for other occupational programs.
Priority "E" -- Non-occupational.

SECTION VI: Approval Status


  1. APPROVAL STATUS:




 New Course

Board Approval Date:      

Effective Semester:      

 Addition of Existing District Course

College Approval Date:      

Effective Semester:      

 Course Change*

College Approval Date:      




X Outline Update

College Approval Date 3-2005

3-2005


* Changes to a course require the completion of a “Course Change Request" form and approval by the Curriculum Committee. In some cases districtwide approval is also required; see, Administrative Regulation E-65, section 3(c) for details.

SECTION VII: Approval Information for New or Added Courses

(Cmplete in consultation with Department Chair and the appropriate Aademic Aministrator)




  1. IF THIS IS A NEW COURSE, INDICATE HOW THE COLLEGE PLANS TO MEET THE EXPENSE OF THIS COURSE:

By additional funds. Describe:




     

By deleting courses from the college catalog and course database. List specific courses to be deleted:




     

By deleting sections of existing courses: List courses and number of sections to be deleted:


First year:       Second year:       Third year:      
By rotating sections of existing courses. List courses and number of sections to be rotated, as well as the semesters in which they will be offered:


     



  1. IMPACT -- Will this course directly impact other course offerings and/or associate degree or certificate programs on campus?

 (If yes, briefly explain how)


     




  1. METHOD OF SUPPORT -- Indicate how the college plans to support the proposed course:

Additional staff- List additional staff needed:




     

Classroom- List classroom type needed:




     

Equipment- List new equipment needed and indicate funding source for any new equipment:




     

Supplies- List supplies and indicate dollar value:




     

Library/Learning Resources -Complete 1-3 in consultation with college librarian







  1. LIBRARY BOOK COLLECTION - Review the library book collection by searching the online catalog. Explain how the book collection supports or does not support the course. Consider age and subject content when determining the relevancy of the collection to the course content.

Enciclopedia Hisipanica REF AE61 E53 2003

Handbook of Hispanic Cultures in the United States REF E 184S75 H365 1993

Dos Mundos: A Communicative Approach PC 4129 E5 D67 1986b

Antologia de Cuentos Infantiles Editorial Epoca S. A. de C. V. Mexico, D. F, 2003

In addition to these books the Library offers books such as:

Invenciones y descubrimientos

El sombrero de tio Nacho

Aladino


Como Nacio el arco iris
PERIODICAL COLLECTION - Review the periodical collection by searching the periodical database. Explain how the periodical titles held by the college library and the full-text titles in the database are relevant or not relevant to the course content.
La Opinion, newspaper

Nuestra Gente, magazine

www. Ipr-hispanic.com/nuestra gente

EL Heraldo, newspaper


ADDITIONAL MATERIAL - List additional materials for the Library/LRC to purchase

that would support the course content.

Intermedia Spanish software with a combination of tenses

Cultural videos related to art, music, food, politics, social problems, etc.




CERTIFICATION AND RECOMMENDATION

 This course meets Title 5 requirements for Associate Degree applicable college credit towards an Associate of Arts Degree.
 This course meets Title 5 requirements but does not satisfy the requirements for an Associate Degree applicable course.
We certify that the information and answers above properly represent this course.











Originator




Date

Department/Cluster Chairperson




Date

Articulation Officer




Date

Librarian




Date

Dean (if applicable)





Date

Curriculum Committee Chairperson




Date

Academic Senate President




Date

Vice President, Academic Affairs




Date

College President




Date




1 Underlined course attributes are the same for the course throughout the LACCD; all other course attributes are college specific.

2 In general “activity” courses or portions of courses are classified a “laboratory.”

3


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