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Course Code: eng 381 Year of Study: 3 Number of Credits


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Hong Kong Shue Yan University

Department of English Language & Literature

1st Semester, 2015-2016


Course Title: The Sound System of English

Course Code: ENG 381

Year of Study: 3

Number of Credits: 3

Duration in weeks: 15

Contact Hours per Week: Lecture (2 Hours), Tutorial (1 Hour)

Pre-requisite(s): Completion of ENG 160 (Introduction to Linguistics)

Prepared by: Dr. Josephine Yam

Course Aims

This course is an in-depth study of the sound system of English. It aims at examining the phonetic and phonological aspects of the English language and consolidating students’ phonetic and phonological knowledge acquired in their first year linguistics study. It also serves to bridge the gap between “Introduction to Linguistics” (ENG160) and “The Phonological Studies in World Englishes” (ENG 450).


Course Learning Outcomes, Teaching and Learning Activities and Assessment Tasks

Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs)

Upon completion of this course students should be able to:

CILO1

identify the segmental and suprasegmental features of English

CILO2

demonstrate articulate English pronunciation and transcribe with International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)

CILO3

Identify, describe and/or produce different English pronunciation features in natural speech

CILO4

discuss and apply phonological concepts and rules related to English speech




Teaching and Learning Activities (TLAs)

TLA1

Exemplification of core issues and concepts with relevant examples

TLA2

Discussion of phonetics and phonological phenomena

TLA3

Practising audiolingual materials

TLA4

In-class Discussion

TLA5

Individual/Pair Assignment

TLA6

Group Oral Presentation

TLA7

Term Paper



Assessment Tasks (ATs)

AT1

In-class Assignments

20% (10% x 2)

AT2

Group Presentation

20%

AT3

Individual Term Paper

20%

AT4

Final Examination

40%




TOTAL

100%



Alignment of Course Intended Learning Outcomes, Teaching and Learning Activities and Assessment Tasks

Course Intended Learning Outcomes

Teaching and Learning Activities

Assessment Tasks

CILO1

TLA1,2,3,4,5,6

AT1,2,3,4

CILO2

TLA2,3,5,6

AT1,2,4

CILO3

TLA2,3,4,5,6,7

AT1,2,3,4

CILO4

TLA1,2,4,5,6,7

AT2,3,4


Course Outline

Week 1: Brief History of the English Sound System

- Language Family

- Origin, Development and Change
Required Reading:

McCrum, R., R. MacNeil and W. Cran. (2002). The Story of English. Harmondsworth: Penguin. pp. 1-45.




Week 2: Production of Speech Sounds

- Articulatory Mechanism

- Vocal Apparatus

- Place and Manner of Articulation


Required Readings

Roach, P. (2009). English Phonetics and Phonology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 8-18.

Clark, J., C. Yallop and J. Fletcher. (2006). An Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology.

Oxford: Blackwell Publishing. pp. 10-54.




Week 3: English Phonemes

- Description and Classification of Consonants



  • Manner of Articulation

  • Place of Articulation

Required Reading:

Roach, P. (2009). English Phonetics and Phonology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 27-37.


Week 4: English Phonemes

- Description and Classification of Vowels



  • Monophthongs, Diphthongs and Triphthongs

  • Tongue Height

  • Parts of Tongue

  • Tongue Muscle

  • Lip Roundedness

Required Reading:

Roach, P. (2009). English Phonetics and Phonology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 19-26.


Week 5: IPA Transcription

- IPA


- Phonemic and Phonetic Transcription
Required Readings:

Roach, P. (2009). English Phonetics and Phonology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 38-47.

International Phonetic Association. (1999). Handbook of the International Phonetic Association: A Guide to the Use of the International Phonetic Alphabet. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Symbols for English phonemes)


Week 6: Reading Week

Week 7: Spelling and Pronunciation

- English Alphabets and English Phonemes

- Phoneme Grapheme Correspondence
Required Reading:

Beck, I. L. (2006). Making Sense of Phonics: The Hows and Whys. NY: Guildford Press. pp. 1-47.





Week 8: Syllable Structure of English

- Syllable Structure

- Phonotactic Constraints
Required Reading:

Roach, P. (2009). English Phonetics and Phonology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 70-80




Week 9: Word Stress

- Nature of Stress

- Stress Assignment
Required Reading:

Roach, P. (2009). English Phonetics and Phonology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 93-111.




Week 10: Weak Forms

  • Types of Weak Form

  • Word, Phrase and Sentential Level

Required Reading:

Roach, P. (2009). English Phonetics and Phonology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 112-120.

Mortimer, C. (2008). Elements of Pronunciation: Intensive Practice for Intermediate and More Advanced Students. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 4-5 and 61-12.





Week 11: Connected Speech

- Assimilation, Elision and Linking


Required Reading:

Roach, P. (2009). English Phonetics and Phonology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 134-155.

Mortimer, C. (2008). Elements of Pronunciation: Intensive Practice for Intermediate and More Advanced Students. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 45-47.


Week 12: Tone

- Description and Analysis of English Tones

- Functions of English Tones
Required Reading:

Roach, P. (2009). English Phonetics and Phonology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 156-161.




Week 13: Intonation and Rhythm

- Description and Analysis of Intonation and Rhythm

of English

Required Reading:

Roach, P. (2009). English Phonetics and Phonology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 162-170.

Wells, J. (2006). English Intonation: An Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge

University Press. pp. 1-24.


Week 14: Phonological Rules and Phonological Phenomena of English

- Minimal Pairs

- Complementary Distribution

- Neutralisation

- Voicing Agreement in Plurality, Grammatical Person

and Tense


Required Reading:

Giegerich, H. (1992). English Phonology: An Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 291-324.




Week 15: Reading Week



Academic Honesty

You are expected to do your own work. Dishonesty in fulfilling any assignment undermines the learning process and the integrity of your university degree. Engaging in dishonest or unethical behaviour is forbidden and will result in disciplinary action, specifically a failing grade on the assignment with no opportunity for resubmission. A second infraction will result in an F for the course and a report to University officials. Examples of prohibited behaviour are:



  • Cheating – an act of deception by which a student misleadingly demonstrates that s/he has mastered information on an academic exercise. Examples include:

    • Copying or allowing another to copy a test, quiz, paper, or project

    • Submitting a paper or major portions of a paper that has been previously submitted for another class without permission of the current instructor

    • Turning in written assignments that are not your own work (including homework)

  • Plagiarism – the act of representing the work of another as one’s own without giving credit.

    • Failing to give credit for ideas and material taken from others

    • Representing another’s artistic or scholarly work as one’s own

  • Fabrication – the intentional use of invented information or the falsification of research or other findings with the intent to deceive

To comply with the University’s policy, term paper has to be submitted to VeriGuide.

Resources
Primary Reading:
Roach, P. (2009). English Phonetics and Phonology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (plus the accompanying CDs)

Website for the book: http://www.cambridge.org/hk/elt/catalogue/subject/project/item5629545/English-Phonetics-and-Phonology-Product-Home/?site_locale=zh_HK¤tSubjectID=382387


Supplementary Readings:


Ashby, M. & J. Maidment. (2005). Introducing Phonetic Science. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Ball, M. J. & J. Rahilly. (1999). Phonetics: The Science of Speech. London: Edward Arnold.




Beck, I. L. (2006). Making Sense of Phonics: The Hows and Whys. New York: Guildford Press.
Carr, P. (2013). English Phonetics and Phonology: An Introduction. Oxford: Blackwell. Philip Carr (Author)

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Catford, J. C. (2001). A Practical Introduction to Phonetics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.


Clark, J., C. Yallop & J. Fletcher. (2006). An Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology. Oxford: Blackwell.


Collins, B. & I.M. Mees. (2013). Practical Phonetics and Phonology: A Resource Book for Students. Oxon: Routledge.


Cruttenden, A. (2001). Gimson's Pronunciation of English. London: Edward Arnold.


Crystal, D. (2008). A Dictionary of Linguistics and Phonetics. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.
Dalton, C., & B. Seidlhofer. (1994). Pronunciation. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Dauer, R. M. (1993). Accurate English: A Complete Course in Pronunciation. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall Regents.


Edwards, H. T. (2002) Applied Phonetics: The Sounds of American English. NY:

Delmar/Cengage Learning.


Edwards, H. T. & A. L. Gregg. (2003). Applied Phonetics Workbook: A Systematic Approach to Phonetic Transcription. NY: Cengage Learning.
Giegerich, H. (1992). English Phonology: An Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Gilbert, J. (2006). Clear Speech (3rd ed.). New York: Cambridge University Press. (Intermediate Level). See also Teacher resource book.


Grant, L. (2007). Well Said Intro. Boston: Thomson/Heinle.
Gunning, T. G. (2000). (illustrated by Norma Kable) Phonological Awareness and Primary Phonics. Boston : Allyn and Bacon.

Hardcastle, W. & J.D. Laver. (eds.) (1999). The Handbook of Phonetic Sciences. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.


Heilman, A. W. (2002). Phonics in Proper Perspective. Upper Saddle River: Merrill.

Hewings, M. (2004). Pronunciation Practice Activities: A Resource Book for Teaching English Pronunciation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
House, L.I. (1998). Introductory Phonetics and Phonology: A Workbook Approach. Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum.

International Phonetic Association. (1999). Handbook of the International Phonetic Association: A Guide to the Use of the International Phonetic Alphabet. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.


Johnson, K. (2003). Acoustic and Auditory Phonetics. Oxford: Blackwell.


Jones, D. (1997). English Pronouncing Dictionary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.


Kelly, G. (2000). How to Teach Pronunciation. Harlow: Longman.


Kreidler, C.W. (2004). The Pronunciation of English. Oxford: Blackwell.

Ladefoged, P. (2001). A Course in Phonetics. New York: Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich.


Ladefoged, P. (2004). Vowels and Consonants. Malden: Blackwell.




Lecumberri, M.L. & J.A. Maidment. (2000). English Transcription Course. London: Arnold.
McCracken, M. J. & R. A., McCraken. (1996). Spelling through Phonics. Winnipeg: Peguis.

McCrum, R., R., MacNeil & W. Cran. (2002). The Story of English: Revised Edition. Harmondsworth: Penguin.
Morley, J. (Ed.) (1987). Current Perspectives on Pronunciation: Practices Anchored in Theory. Alexandria: Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages.
Morley, J. (Ed.) (1994). Pronunciation Pedagogy and Theory: New Views, New Directions. Alexandria: Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages.

Mortimer, C. (2008). Elements of Pronunciation: Intensive Practice for Intermediate and More Advanced Students. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Moustafa, M. (1997). Beyond Traditional Phonics: Research Discoveries and Reading Instruction. Portsmouth: Heinemann.

Pennington, M. (1996). Phonology in English Language Teaching. Harlow: Addison Wesley.


Pisonni, D. (ed.) (2007). The Handbook of Speech Perception. Malden: Blackwell.


Roach, P. (1992). Introducing Phonetics. Harmondsworth: Penguin.


Roach, P. (2000). A Little Encyclopedia of Phonetics. http://www.personal.reading.ac.uk/~llsroach/encyc.pdf
Rudder, J. (2010). The IPA for Language Learning: An Introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet. www.nativlang.com
Weinstein, N. (2000). Whaddya say?: Guided practice in relaxed speech. White Plains: Prentice Hall Regents/Longman/Pearson.
Wells, J. (2006) English Intonation: An Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Yava, M. (2006). Applies English Phonology. Oxford: Blackwell.
Zsiga, E. (2013). The Sounds of Language: An Introduction to Phonetics and

Phonology. Malden: Blackwell.




Elizabeth C. Zsiga (Author)

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Term Paper Assessment Rubric




Exemplary

Satisfactory

Developing/ Emerging

Unsatisfactory

Focus
Weight for this criterion:
20% of total score

Presents an insightful and focused thesis statement.

Presents a thesis statement with adequate insight and focus.

Presents a thesis statement with minimal insight and focus.

Presents a thesis statement with no insight or focus.

Draws strong and clear connections between the thesis and significant related ideas.

Draws adequate connections between thesis and related ideas.

Draws insufficient connections between thesis and related ideas.

Shows no understanding
of connections between thesis and related ideas.

Organization
Weight for this criterion:
20% of total score

Effectively provides a logical
progression of related ideas and supporting information in the body of the paper.

Adequately provides a progression
of ideas and supporting information
in the body of the paper.

Provides a poorly organized progression of ideas and supporting information in the body of the paper.

Does not provide a progression

of ideas and supporting information in the body of the paper.



Effectively
uses transitions to connect supporting information clearly.

Adequately
uses transitions to connect supporting information.

Ineffectively uses transitions to connect supporting information.

Does not use transitions to connect supporting information.

Arrives at a
well-documented, logical conclusion, involving critical thinking.

Arrives at an adequately-documented conclusion.

Arrives at an insufficiently documented conclusion.

Does not arrive at a documented conclusion.

Support/ Elaboration
Weight for this criterion:
30% of total score

Effectively synthesizes complex ideas from research sources.

Sufficiently synthesizes ideas from research sources.

Ineffectively synthesizes ideas from research sources.

No evidence of synthesizing ideas from research sources.

Demonstrates exceptional selection of supporting information clearly relevant to the thesis and its related ideas.

Demonstrates sufficient selection of supporting information clearly relevant to the thesis and its related ideas.

Demonstrates insufficient selection of supporting information clearly relevant to the thesis and its related ideas.

Lacks supporting information clearly relevant to thesis and its related ideas.

Provides a meaningful presentation of multiple perspectives.

Provides an adequate presentation of multiple perspectives.

Provides a limited presentation of multiple perspectives.

Does not present multiple perspectives.

Effectively balances use of quotations and student paraphrasing.

Adequately balances use of quotations and student paraphrasing.

Insufficiently balances use of quotations and student paraphrasing.

Does not balance use of quotations and student paraphrasing.

Style
Weight for this criterion:
10% of total score

Exhibits skillful use of language, including effective word choice, clarity, and consistent voice.

Exhibits good use of language, including some mastery of word choice, clarity, and consistent voice.

Exhibits ineffective use of language, including weak word choice, limited clarity, and inconsistent voice.

Exhibits severely flawed use of language, including weak word choice, no clarity, and no voice.


Demonstrates exceptional fluency through varied sentence structure, paragraphing, flow of ideas, and transitions.

Demonstrates sufficient fluency through sentence structure, paragraphing, flow of ideas, and transitions.

Demonstrates limited fluency through sentence structure, paragraphing, flow of ideas, and transitions.

Lacks fluency through sentence structure, paragraphing, flow of ideas, and transitions.

Conventions
Weight for this criterion:
10% of total score

Demonstrates a sophisticated use of the prescribed format (APA), including title page, pagination, and citations.

Demonstrates adequate use of the prescribed format (APA), including title page, pagination, and citations.

Demonstrates limited use of the prescribed format (APA), including title page, pagination, and citations.

Demonstrates
no use of the prescribed format (APA), including title page, pagination, and citations.

Consistently uses standard writing conventions
in grammar, spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage.

Generally
uses standard writing conventions
in grammar, spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage.

Minimally
uses standard writing conventions
in grammar, spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage.

Does not use standard writing conventions in grammar, spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage.

Information Literacy
Weight for this criterion:
10% of total score

Conscientiously and consistently demonstrates integrity in citing practices.

Generally demonstrates integrity in citing practices.

Inconsistently demonstrates integrity in citing practices.

Does not demonstrate integrity in citing practices.

Effectively employs an extensive variety of primary and secondary sources, including a significant amount of
current information.

Adequately employs a sufficient variety of primary and secondary sources including a sufficient amount of current information.

Employs a limited variety of primary and secondary sources including an insufficient amount of current information.

Does not employ a variety of primary and secondary sources and/or does not include current information.

Demonstrates strong evaluation skills in determining resource credibility and reliability.

Demonstrates sufficient evaluation skills in determining resource credibility and reliability.

Demonstrates limited evaluation skills in determining resource credibility and reliability.

Demonstrates no evaluation skills to determine resource credibility and reliability.


Oral Presentation Assessment Rubric

Criteria

Exemplary

Satisfactory

Developing

Unsatisfactory

Communication Skills
Weight for this criterion:
20% of total score

Consistently speaks with appropriate volume, tone, and articulation.

Generally speaks with appropriate volume, tone, and articulation.

Has difficulty speaking with appropriate volume, tone, and articulation.

Does not speak with appropriate volume, tone, and articulation.


Consistently employs appropriate eye contact and posture.

Frequently employs appropriate eye contact and posture.

Employs infrequent eye contact and/or poor posture.

Makes no eye contact.

Consistently employs appropriate nonverbal communication techniques.

Adequately employs appropriate nonverbal communication techniques.

Employs limited nonverbal communication techniques.

Does not employ nonverbal communication techniques.

Consistently exhibits poise, enthusiasm, and confidence.

Generally exhibits poise, enthusiasm, and confidence.

Exhibits limited poise, enthusiasm, and confidence.

Lacks poise, enthusiasm, and confidence.

Consistently employs standard grammar.

Generally employs standard grammar.

Infrequently employs standard grammar.

Does not employ standard grammar.

Adheres to prescribed time guidelines.

Adheres to prescribed time guidelines.

Violates prescribed time guidelines.

Violates prescribed time guidelines.

Employs creative use of visual aids that enrich or reinforce presentation.

Employs appropriate visual aids that relate to presentation.

Employs ineffective visual aids.


Uses no visual aids.


Content and Coherence
Weight for this criterion:
60% of total score

Very clear and accurate analysis of the related language phenomena from the selected excerpts.

Clear and accurate analysis of the related language phenomena from the selected excerpts.

Analysis of the related language phenomena from the selected excerpts can be more accurate and clearer.

Analysis of the related language phenomena from the selected excerpts is not accurate and clear.






Effectively defines a main idea and clearly adheres to its purpose throughout presentation.

Adequately defines a main idea and adheres to its purpose throughout presentation.

Insufficiently defines a main idea and adheres to its purpose throughout presentation.

Does not define a main idea or adhere to its purpose.


Employs a logical and engaging sequence which the audience can follow.

Employs a logical sequence which the audience can follow.

Employs an ineffective sequence confusing to the audience.

Lacks an organizational sequence.

Responses to questions
Weight for this criterion:
20% of total score

Confidently, politely, and accurately responds to lecturer’s or classmates’ questions and comments.

Politely and accurately responds to lecturer’s or classmates’ questions and comments.


Ineffectively responds to lecturer’s or classmates’ questions and comments.


Unacceptably responds/does not respond to lecturer’s or classmates’ questions and comments.



Assessment Tasks Explanation
AT1: Individual Assessment (10% x 2)

1: In-class listening test – you are asked to recognise English vowels and consonants in the recordings

2: In-class transcription task + syllabification – you are asked to transcribe some simple English words phonemically and explain the syllabification of the words provided.
AT2: Group Presentation (20%)

In a group of 4, students have to show some excerpts (a total of 10 minutes) of natural English speech from some audio-visual materials. They are required to highlight the different features in natural and casual speech of English and explain the phonetic and phonological features found in those excerpts.


AT3: Term Paper (20%)

Individual take-home assignment: The essay should be related to the issues discussed in class. The focus should be on English speech in relation to phonetics and phonology.




  • The word limit of this paper is 2000 – 2400 words.

  • The paper should be in APA style.

  • The deadline of submission is 14 Dec 2015.

  • A hardcopy of your work with the signed VeriGuide declaration form should be submitted to the instructor AND a softcopy should be uploaded to VeriGuide.



NOTE:

Do not plagiarise! ”ZERO” mark will be given to any plagiarised assignments.



To avoid plagiarising, think carefully, write in your words and always acknowledge your source of information. Please refer to the APA file for more information on format and referencing of your writing.




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